kenning

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See also: Kenning

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English kenning, derivative of Middle English kennen (to know, perceive). Compare Danish kending (acquaintance). More at ken.

Noun[edit]

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. (obsolete) Sight; view; a distant view at sea.
  2. (obsolete) Range or extent of vision, especially at sea; (by extension) a marine measure of approximately twenty miles.
  3. As little as one can recognise or discriminate; a small portion; a little.
    put in a kenning of salt

Verb[edit]

kenning

  1. present participle of ken

Etymology 2[edit]

From ken (to beget, bring forth).

Noun[edit]

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. The tread of an egg; cicatricula.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse, from kenna (know, perceive), from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, causative of *kunnaną (to know how). Compare can, ken, keen.

Noun[edit]

Examples
  • whale road for ‘sea’
  • enemy of the mast for ‘wind’
  • ice of shields for ‘sword’

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. (poetry) A metaphorical phrase used in Germanic poetry (especially Old English or Old Norse) whereby a simple thing is described in an allusive way.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse kenning.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kenning

  1. (poetry) kenning

Declension[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Etymology[edit]

From kenna +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kenning f (genitive singular kenningar, nominative plural kenningar)

  1. theory
  2. religious doctrine, teaching
  3. lesson
  4. (poetry) kenning (circumlocution used instead of an ordinary noun in Old Norse, Old English and later Icelandic poetry)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]