kie

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See also: -kie and ki'e

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ky, from Old English (cows), plural of (cow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kie

  1. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) plural of cow
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for kie in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ki- (interrogative and relative correlative prefix) + -e (correlative suffix of place)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Conjunction[edit]

kie (accusative kien)

  1. where
    Tie li trovis post unuhora promenado kaj pridemandado la ponton, kie li trovos sian feliĉon.
    There he found, after one hour of walking and interrogating, the bridge, where he would find his happiness.

Adverb[edit]

kie (accusative kien)

  1. where

Derived terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Like other interrogative and relative correlatives, kie can be combined with ajn, the adverbial particle of generality. Kie ajn thus means wherever.


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

kie

  1. plural of cou

Ter Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *ke.

Pronoun[edit]

kie

  1. who

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors, Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland, 2002-2008

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English keye.

Noun[edit]

kie

  1. quay

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole, William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, 1867, →ISBN