io

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Translingual[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbreviation of English and Ido Ido

Symbol[edit]

io

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Ido.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From New Latin, from Ancient Greek Ἰώ (Iṓ, Io).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɪəʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪəʊ

Noun[edit]

io (plural ios)

  1. A type of moth, the io moth.
    • 1936, Paul Griswold Howes, Hand book for the curious:
      These lines appear to serve as roadways or guides to any stragglers that may have hung back for some reason known only to an io.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin ; compare Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ, oh!).

Interjection[edit]

io

  1. (rare) An exclamation of joy or triumph.
    • 1913, Crowley, Aleister, “Hymn To Pan”, in Book 4[1], University of California Libraries, Magick in Theory and Practice:
      Do as thou wilt, as a great god can,
      O Pan! Io Pan!
      Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! I am awake
      In the grip of the snake.

Anagrams[edit]

Aromanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. Alternative form of iou (I)

Chuukese[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. who

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin io, from Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ). Doublet of jo.

Interjection[edit]

io

  1. (dated) io (exclamation of triumph)

Further reading[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From i- (indeterminate correlative prefix) +‎ -o (correlative suffix of objects).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

io (accusative ion)

  1. something (indeterminate correlative of objects)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The plural forms ioj and iojn are nonstandard and rare.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from Italian io.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. I
    Io te ama.
    I love you.

Istro-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronoun[edit]

io (first-person singular, plural noi)

  1. I

Declension[edit]

nominative io
accusative stressed mire
unstressed me (m')
dative stressed mi
unstressed âm
genitive masc. sg. meu/mev
fem. sg. me
masc. pl. meľ
fem. pl. mele

Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

io (personal, first person, possessive mio)

  1. I (the first-person singular nominative pronoun)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Italian being a pro-drop language, subject pronouns are mostly omitted, both in the written and spoken language, as the inflected verb is conjugated by person. An example would be: Mangio una mela, which is much more common than Io mangio una mela, where the subject can be inferred from the inflected form mangio; similarly È carina instead of Lei è carina. The explicit usage of personal pronouns may sound redundant to a native speaker, except when it is used in order to emphasize the subject. (Io mangio una mela could be interpreted as I am eating an apple and you are not).

Descendants[edit]

  • Interlingua: io

See also[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

io

  1. Rōmaji transcription of いお

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Echoic; compare Greek ἰώ (iṓ), or English yo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

  1. An exclamation of joy: Ho!, Hurray!, Hurrah!
  2. An exclamation of pain: Oh!, Ah!, Alas!
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.447–448:
      illa quidem clāmābat ‘, cārissima māter, auferor!’
      Indeed, she was crying out, “Oh! mother dearest – I am being taken away!”
      (See Persephone. The full context implies a cry of anguish as well as a plea for help from Persephone's mother, Ceres. The alternative ‘‘Help!’’ calls for an imperative such as ‘‘ferte auxilium!’’.)
  3. An exclamation for getting one’s attention, used in a sudden or vehement call: Look!, Quick!, Yo!

References[edit]

  • io”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • io”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • io in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • io”, in
    The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • io”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • io”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Macanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Kristang yo.

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. Alternative form of iou: I, me
    io samI am

Megleno-Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. I

Neapolitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈi/, /ˈiə/, /ˈjə/

Pronoun[edit]

io

  1. I (the first-person singular nominative pronoun)

Coordinate terms[edit]

Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

References[edit]

  • AIS: Sprach- und Sachatlas Italiens und der Südschweiz [Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Italy and Southern Switzerland] – map 1638: “volete che ci vada io” – on navigais-web.pd.istc.cnr.it

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *aiw.

Adverb[edit]

io

  1. always, every time, continuously
    • 1981, Arend Quak, chapter 1, in Die altmittel- und altniederfränkischen Psalmen und Glossen. Nach den Handschriften und Erstdrucken neu herausgegeben. [The Old Middle and Old Lower Franconian Psalms and Glosses. Republished after the manuscripts and original publications.] (Amsterdamer Publikationen zur Sprache und Literatur; 47)‎[3], Amsterdam: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 69:
      Duncla uuerthin ougon iro that sia ne gesian in rukgi iro io an crumbe.
      May their eyes be blinded so they (can) not see, and may their back keep getting bent!
    • 1981, Arend Quak, chapter 1, in Die altmittel- und altniederfränkischen Psalmen und Glossen. Nach den Handschriften und Erstdrucken neu herausgegeben. [The Old Middle and Old Lower Franconian Psalms and Glosses. Republished after the manuscripts and original publications.] (Amsterdamer Publikationen zur Sprache und Literatur; 47)‎[4], Amsterdam: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 71:
      An thi sang min io.
      For you is always my song.
  2. ever, at some point, sometime
    • 1971, Willy Sanders, editor, (Expositio) Willerammi Eberspergensis abbatis in canticis canticorum. Die Leidener Handschrift. (Kleine deutsche Prosadenkmäler des Mittelalters; 9)‎[5] (overall work in Latin and Old High German), München: Wilhelm Fink, page 52:
      So wer ouch thurgh godes willan thiro wereld arbeyde muothe, wie magh her ie ze meeron ruowan cuman, thanne thaz her uollecume 'ad fontem totius boni'?
      And whoever by God's will is tired by the burdens of the world, how can he ever attain peace better than that he reaches the source of all good?

Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • “ie”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek[6], 2012

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *aiw, whence also Old English ā, Old Saxon eo, Old Norse ei, Old Dutch ēwa, io.

Adverb[edit]

io

  1. always

Descendants[edit]

  • >? German: je

Romanian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

io

  1. Obsolete form of iuo.

References[edit]

  • io in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

io

  1. (transitive) to marry

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of io (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tiio miio aio
2nd person niio fiio
3rd person inanimate iio diio
animate
imperative niio, io fiio, io

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[7], Pacific linguistics

Yoruba[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Nupe ewó, Edo ígho, Urhobo ígho

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /īó/, /ī.ɣó/

Noun[edit]

  1. (Ekiti) money, cowry
    Synonym:

Derived terms[edit]