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U+5263, 剣
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-5263

[U+5262]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+5264]

Translingual[edit]

Traditional
Shinjitai
Simplified

Glyph origin[edit]

Unorthodox variant of .

Han character[edit]

(radical 18, +8, 10 strokes, cangjie input 人人中弓 (OOLN) or X人人中弓 (XOOLN), composition)

References[edit]

  • KangXi: not present, would follow page 141, character 41
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 2076
  • Dae Jaweon: page 321, character 13
  • Hanyu Da Zidian: volume 1, page 345, character 4
  • Unihan data for U+5263

Chinese[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of – see (“sword; dagger; sabre”).
(This character, , is a variant form of .)

Japanese[edit]

Shinjitai

Kyūjitai

Kanji[edit]

(common “Jōyō” kanjishinjitai kanji, kyūjitai form )

  1. double-edged sword
  2. swordsmanship

Readings[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
: A ken or tsurugi with (saya, scabbard).
Kanji in this term
けん
Grade: S
on’yomi

Etymology 1[edit]

/kem//kemʉ//keɴ/

From Middle Chinese (MC kɨɐmH).

Compare modern Mandarin (jiàn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana けん, rōmaji ken)

  1. a sword, especially one with a double-edged blade
  2. swordsmanship
    Synonym: 剣術 (kenjutsu)
  3. a bayonet
    Synonym: 銃剣 (jūken)
  4. (entomology) a stinger
  5. (entomology) an ovipositor
  6. a 家紋 (kamon, family crest), with varying designs of double-edged blades
Usage notes[edit]

This term refers to swords in general.[2]

Derived terms[edit]
Idioms[edit]
Proverbs[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

(hiragana けん, rōmaji Ken)

  1. a male given name

Etymology 2[edit]

Kanji in this term
つるぎ
Grade: S
kun’yomi

⟨turuki1 → */turukʲi//t͡suruɡi/

Shift from Old Japanese tsuruki,[1][2] itself of unknown derivation.

A surface analysis suggests that this might be a compound of 釣る, 吊る (tsuru, to hang, as at one's side) + ki, but there is no clear etymon for the ki portion. One possibility would be (fang), read as kiba in modern Japanese but also appearing as ki in Old Japanese contexts. Such usage might parallel the combined tooth and blade meanings of the term ha, spelled more specifically as (tooth) and (blade), with these two senses listed as cognates in Japanese dictionaries.[1][2]

More tentative suggestions have been connections to Austronesian, such as Tagalog suligi (dart, short spear), but such possibilities seem only speculative at present.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana つるぎ, rōmaji tsurugi)

  1. a sword
Usage notes[edit]

This term usually refers more specifically to double-edged swords, as opposed to the single-edged (katana).[2]

Derived terms[edit]
Idioms[edit]
Proverbs[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

(hiragana つるぎ, rōmaji Tsurugi)

  1. a female given name
  2. a surname

Etymology 3[edit]

Kanji in this term
まやか
Grade: S
Irregular

Unknown. Japanese names often apply readings from other words to allude to different meanings.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Irregular reading)

Proper noun[edit]

(shinjitai kanji, kyūjitai kanji , hiragana まやか, rōmaji Mayaka)

  1. a female given name

Coordinate terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan