spite

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a shortening of Middle English despit, from Old French despit (whence despite). Cf. also Dutch spijt.

Noun[edit]

spite (usually uncountable, plural spites)

  1. Ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; a desire to vex or injure; petty malice; grudge; rancor.
    He was so filled with spite for his ex-wife, he could not hold down a job.
    They did it just for spite.
    • Shakespeare
      This is the deadly spite that angers.
  2. (obsolete) Vexation; chagrin; mortification.
    "The time is out of joint: O cursed spite." Shakespeare, Hamlet
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

spite (third-person singular simple present spites, present participle spiting, simple past and past participle spited)

  1. (transitive) To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart.
    She soon married again, to spite her ex-husband.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To be angry at; to hate.
    The Danes, then [] pagans, spited places of religion. — Fuller.
  3. (transitive) To fill with spite; to offend; to vex.
    Darius, spited at the Magi, endeavoured to abolish not only their learning, but their language. — Sir. W. Temple.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Preposition[edit]

spite

  1. Notwithstanding; despite.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English spite.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

spite

  1. in spite of
  2. defiantly

Usage notes[edit]

Often used with the accusative or with the preposition al.

Derived terms[edit]