hade

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See also: hadé, hádě, and haðe

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hod, had, hed, from Old English hād (person, individual, character, individuality, degree, rank, order, office, holy office, condition, state, nature, character, form, manner, sex, race, family, tribe, choir), from Proto-Germanic *haiduz (appearance, kind), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kāi- (light, bright, shining). Cognate with Old Saxon hēd (condition, rank), Old High German heit (person, personality, sex, condition, quality, rank), Old Norse heiðr ("honour, dignity") (whence Danish hæder (honour), Swedish heder (honour)), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (haidus, way, manner). Same as -hood. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hade (plural hades)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal, Scotland) State; order, estate, rank, degree, or quality.
    • 1838, The Holy Scriptures, Faithfully and Truly:
      And I tolde the of the good hade of my God which was vpo me:
    • 1860, Thomas Occleve, De regimine principum:
      My name was alle that I there gate, To wynne honour was onely the purpose Whiche that I tooke ; or that I come thereate, Other good hade I none than riche lose ;
    • 1882, Great Britain. Public Record Office, Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, page 584:
      And I said it was don he wolde not cum in in that furme, for a mon of his hade met me be ye way withe an endenture was not like to be fulfillet.

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain. Perhaps from a dialectal form of head.

Verb[edit]

hade (third-person singular simple present hades, present participle hading, simple past and past participle haded)

  1. (geology, mining) To slope or incline from the vertical.
    • 1935, Institution of Mining Engineers (Great Britain), Transactions, page 60:
      It was found, however, that where the coal haded away from the floor towards the face, as in Fig. 2(6), [...]
    • 1967, Mining and Minerals Engineering:
      The author details the benefits arising from arranging the quarry faces to be haded backwards at say 20-25° off vertical and to be of reasonable height, say 50-60ft. These include the reduction of danger ...
    • 2000, Lindsey Porter, John Albert Robey, The Copper & Lead Mines Around the Manifold Valley, North Staffordshire:
      Plot's observation that the veins haded to the north-east is consistent with the workings around Stone Quarry Mine but not the main Ecton Pipe at depth nor the mines from Clayton Pipe southwards.

Noun[edit]

hade (plural hades)

  1. (geology) A slope; (in mining) the slope of a vein, fault or dike from the vertical; the complement of the dip.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion, quoted in 1914, William Holden Hutton, Highways and Byways in Shakespeare's Country, page 34:
      The thick and well-growne fogge doth matt my smoother shades,
      And on the lower Leas, as on the higher Hades
      The daintie Clover growes (of grass the onely silke)
      That makes each Udder strout abundantly with milke.
    • 1885, The Rainbow, a magazine of Christian literature, volume 22, page 449:
      [...] as he must have done who had proudly passed by Lazarus on earth when he looked up and beheld how he was honoured in the higher hades.
    • 1935, Institution of Mining Engineers (Great Britain), Transactions, page 60:
      [...] due to the breaks at different hades, the projection might occur at any point from the floor to halfway up the seam.
    • 1957, Great Britain. Mines and Quarries Inspectorate, Report of H.M. Chief Inspector of Mines and Quarries, page 34:
      The face was developed to a good hade and appeared to be satisfactory ;
    • 1984, Yorkshire Geological Society, Proceedings - Volume 45, page 161:
      Laterally continuous normal faulting with differing fault plane dip directions sometimes appears as scissor faulting on plans, but detailed study can show separate throw maxima not coincident with the 'cross-over'; these are better considered as indivicual faults. No good hade information is yet available for faults in this situation.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably a dialectal or variant form of head.

Noun[edit]

hade (plural hades)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, obsolete) A headland; a strip of land at the side of a field upon which a plough may be turned.
    • 1615, in a Map in Corpus Christi College, Oxon, quoted in Wright's English Dialect Dictionary:
      [...] certeine arable landes some of them havinge hades of meadow and grasse grounde lieinge in the Southe fielde of Einsham.
    • 1635, Terrier, quoted in Wright's English Dialect Dictionary:
      6 rodes with hades at both ends. 2 Landes 4 ro. with hades.
    • 1534 [original], Anthony Fitzherbert, Husbandry, republished as Ancient Tracts concerning the Management of landed Property, republished, in The Monthly Review, or Journal (1767), page 270:
      And oxen wyl plowe in tough cley [...] And whereas is now suerall pastures, there the horse plowe is better, for the horses may be teddered, or tyed upon leys, balkes, or hades, whereas oxen may not be kept: and it is used to tedder them, but in fewe places.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Ecclesiastical Terriers of Warwickshire Parishes, volume 22 (printed in 1955), page 36:
      [Item] . . . . . [w]th hades at both endes in the furlong called longe Furlonge of Thomas Vades on the north side and the aforesaide Mr [Bury] [so]wth side.

References[edit]

  • hade at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • hade in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hade

  1. vocative singular of had

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hata.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hade (imperative had, infinitive at hade, present tense hader, past tense hadede, perfect tense har hadet)

  1. to hate

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hade

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はで
  2. Rōmaji transcription of はで

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hād.

Noun[edit]

hade

  1. Alternative form of hod

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English hēafod.

Noun[edit]

hade

  1. Alternative form of heed

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hade

  1. past tense of ha.
    Jag hade en katt en gång.
    I had a cat once.
  2. past tense of hava.