heit

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See also: Heit and -heit

Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

heit

  1. today

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

heit n (genitive singular heits, nominative plural heit)

  1. promise, vow

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • heita (to be called; to promise)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

heit

  1. imperative of heita and heite

Old High German[edit]

Noun[edit]

heit m

  1. Manner

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer, Second Edition

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German heute, Dutch heden.

Adverb[edit]

heit

  1. today

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

heit c (plural heiten, diminutive heitsje)

  1. father, dad
    Synonym: faar
    Coordinate term: mem

Further reading[edit]

  • heit”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse heitr, from Proto-Germanic *haitaz.

Adjective[edit]

heit

  1. hot
  2. eager

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse heita, from Proto-Germanic *haitaną.

Verb[edit]

hêit (present tense hêit, passive heites)

  1. be called or named; have a name
  2. invoke
  3. swear, promise
  4. (impersonal, passive) be thought to be

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse heiti, from heita (to be named).

Noun[edit]

hêit n

  1. a name

Synonyms[edit]