atta

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See also: Atta, attá, átta, attā, åtta, and attą̊

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Determiner[edit]

atta

  1. that's the; that's a
Usage notes[edit]

Used only in expressions like atta boy and atta girl.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hindi आटा (āṭā, flour, farina, dough).

Noun[edit]

atta (uncountable)

  1. (India) A type of wholegrain flour from the Indian subcontinent.
    • 2008, Amitav Ghosh, Sea of Poppies, Penguin 2015, p. 7:
      Kabutri, in the meanwhile, had kneaded some atta and rolled out a few real rotis.

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

atta

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄𐍄𐌰

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

atta

  1. feminine singular of atto

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *átta (father). Cognates include Hittite 𒀜𒋫𒀸 (attas), Gothic 𐌰𐍄𐍄𐌰 (atta), Old Church Slavonic отьць (otĭcĭ) and Ancient Greek ἄττα (átta).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

atta m (genitive attae); first declension

  1. father (term of respect for an old man)

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative atta attae
genitive attae attārum
dative attae attīs
accusative attam attās
ablative attā attīs
vocative atta attae

References[edit]

  • atta in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “atta”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • atta” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • atta in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Old Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse átta, from Proto-Germanic *ahtōu, from Proto-Indo-European *oḱtṓw.

Numeral[edit]

ātta

  1. eight

Descendants[edit]


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

atta ?

  1. ego (clarification of this definition is being sought)

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

atta

  1. singular locative of at