chagrin

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French chagrin ‎(sorrow), of uncertain origin.

A prevalent theory in many dictionaries is that it came from a metaphorical use of Old French chagrin ‎(a type of roughened leather),[1] with the connection of roughness.

Another theory, due to Gamillscheg, is that it derives from Old French graigne ‎(sadness, resentment, grief), from graim ‎(sorrowful), perhaps related to Old High German gram ‎(angry, fierce).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chagrin ‎(countable and uncountable, plural chagrins)

  1. Distress of mind caused by a failure of aims or plans, want of appreciation, mistakes etc; vexation or mortification.
    • 1876, Louisa May Alcott, Rose In Bloom, ch. 8:
      [H]e alone knew how deep was the deluded man's chagrin at the failure of the little plot which he fancied was prospering finely.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, The Tragedy in Dartmoor Terrace[1]:
      “Mrs. Yule's chagrin and horror at what she called her son's base ingratitude knew no bounds ; at first it was even thought that she would never get over it. […]”
  2. A type of leather or skin with a rough surface.[3]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Often used in the form to one’s chagrin.

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

chagrin ‎(third-person singular simple present chagrins, present participle chagrining, simple past and past participle chagrined)

  1. (transitive) To bother or vex; to mortify.
    She was chagrined to note that the paint had dried into a blotchy mess.
  2. (intransitive) To be vexed or annoyed.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The verb form is rarely found in other than passive voice.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://triggs.djvu.org/century-dictionary.com/cent2jpgframes.php?volno=02&page=0909
  2. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/chagrin?s=t
  3. ^ “chagrin” in OED Online, Oxford University Press, 1989.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From chagriner, perhaps from Frankish gram, akin to German Gram[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chagrin m ‎(plural chagrins)

  1. sorrow, grief, chagrin

Adjective[edit]

chagrin m (feminine singular chagrine, masculine plural chagrins, feminine plural chagrines)

  1. (literary) despondent, woeful
  2. (literary) disgruntled, morose

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ chagrin” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

External links[edit]