morose

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French morose, from Latin mōrōsus (particular, scrupulous, fastidious, self-willed, wayward, capricious, fretful, peevish), from mōs (way, custom, habit, self-will). See moral.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose (comparative more morose or moroser, superlative most morose or morosest)

  1. Sullen, gloomy; showing a brooding ill humour.
    Synonyms: melancholy, sulky, crabby, glum, grouchy, gruff, moody
    • 1857, R. M. Ballantyne, The Coral Island:
      If there is any boy or man who loves to be melancholy and morose, and who cannot enter with kindly sympathy into the regions of fun, let me seriously advise him to shut my book and put it away. It is not meant for him.

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mōrōsus (peevish, wayward).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose (plural moroses)

  1. sullen, gloomy, morose

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Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose

  1. feminine plural of moroso

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mōrōse

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōrōsus

References[edit]

  • morose”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • morose”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • morose in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette