morose

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French morose, from Latin mōrōsus (particular, scrupulous, fastidious, self-willed, wayward, capricious, fretful, peevish), from mōs (way, custom, habit, self-will). See moral.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose (comparative more morose or moroser, superlative most morose or morosest)

  1. Sullen, gloomy; showing a brooding ill humour.
    Synonyms: melancholy, sulky, crabby, glum, grouchy, gruff, moody

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mōrōsus (peevish, wayward).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose (plural moroses)

  1. sullen, gloomy, morose

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Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

morose

  1. feminine plural of moroso

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mōrōse

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōrōsus

References[edit]

  • morose in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • morose in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • morose in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette