disquiet

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English[edit]

A woman looking worried

Etymology[edit]

dis- +‎ quiet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

disquiet ‎(uncountable)

  1. Want of quiet; want of tranquility in body or mind; anxiety, disturbance, restlessness, uneasiness.
    The lady exhibited disquiet of mind. In other words, she’d gone a bit mad.
    • 1818, anonymous [Mary Shelley], Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, London: Printed for Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones, OCLC 830979744:
      My journey had been my own suggestion, and Elizabeth therefore acquiesced, but she was filled with disquiet at the idea of my suffering, away from her, the inroads of misery and grief.
    • 1874, Debates of the House of Deputies in the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Held in New York City, October, A.D. 1874, as Reported for “The Churchman,” by D. F. Murphy & Co., Hartford, Conn.: M. H. Mallory and Company, Printers, OCLC 18081025, page 290:
      I wish to say in regard to the alleged matter of disquiet in this Church, that when I received the postal card that was sent, I suppose, to all the clergy of the Church, I could not but feel in my heart that the three distinguished gentlemen who signed that postal card, or whose names were attached to it, and put it forth, were disquieting the Church much more than the Prayer-Book.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

disquiet ‎(comparative more disquiet, superlative most disquiet)

  1. Deprived of quiet; impatient, restless, uneasy.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

disquiet ‎(third-person singular simple present disquiets, present participle disquieting, simple past and past participle disquieted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make (someone or something) worried or anxious.
    He felt disquieted at the lack of interest the child had shown.
    • 1661, Obadiah Sedgwick, “The Gifts of the Covenant. The Second Part. Chapter XIII.”, in The Bowels of Tender Mercy Sealed in the Everlasting Covenant, wherein is Set Forth the Nature, Conditions and Excellencies of It, and How a Sinner Should Do to Enter into It, and the Danger of Refusing this Covenant-relation. Also the Treasures of Grace, Belssings, Comforts, Promises and Priviledges that are Comprized in the Covenant of Gods Free and Rich Mercy Made in Jesus Christ with Believers. By that Faithful and Reverend Divine Mr Obadiah Sedgwick B.D. Late Minister of the Gospel in Covent-Garden, London. Perfected and Intended for the Press, therefore Corrected and Lately Revised by Himself, and Published by His Own Manuscript, Allowed by Himself in His Life-time, by Those whom He Intrusted with This Work for that Purpose, London: Printed by Edward Mottershed, by Adoniram Byfield, and are to be sold by Joseph Cranford, at the sign of the Castle and Lyon in St. Pauls Church-yard, OCLC 801391981, page 663:
      They have been brought up religiouſly, and have been accuſtomed to read, and pray; and if at any time they do neglect and omit these duties, conſcience is upon them and upbraids and diſquiets them; and they are afraid to neglect them, leſt conſcience will queſtion and trouble them.
    • 1707, Edward, Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Begun in the Year 1641. With the Precedent Passages, and Actions, that Contributed thereunto, and the Happy End, and Conclusion thereof by the King's Blessed Restoration, and Return, upon the 29th of May, in the Year 1660, volume I, part I, Oxford: Printed at the Theater, OCLC 27177663, book III, page 236:
      This Bill, for taking away the Bishops Votes out of the Houſe of Peers, produced another Diſcovery, which caſt the Conductors farther behind, than they were Advanced by their Conqueſt amongst the Commons; and diſquieted them much more, than the other had Exalted them.
    • 1780, John Gill, An Exposition of the Whole Old Testament, Critical, Doctrinal, and Practical. In which are Recorded the Original of Mankind, of the Several Nations of the World, and of the Jewish Nation in Particular [...], volume III, new corr. edition, London: Printed for George Keith, in Gracechurch-Street, OCLC 41973714, page 495:
      Diſturbed and disquieted them, and made them very uneaſy; he terrified and distreſſed them; [] [Commentary on 1 Samuel 14:47.]
    • 1864, Anthony Trollope, “The Claverings. Chapter XVI. The Rivals.”, in The Cornhill Magazine, volume XIV, London: Smith, Elder & Co., 65, Cornhill, published July 1866, OCLC 1565148, page 89:
      She had had a wonderful interview respecting Fanny on this very day, and was at this moment disquieting her mind because she could not tell her friend what had happened without a breach of confidence!
    • 1874, Debates of the House of Deputies in the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Held in New York City, October, A.D. 1874, as Reported for “The Churchman,” by D. F. Murphy & Co., Hartford, Conn.: M. H. Mallory and Company, Printers, OCLC 18081025, page 290:
      I wish to say in regard to the alleged matter of disquiet in this Church, that when I received the postal card that was sent, I suppose, to all the clergy of the Church, I could not but feel in my heart that the three distinguished gentlemen who signed that postal card, or whose names were attached to it, and put it forth, were disquieting the Church much more than the Prayer-Book.
    • 2014, Graham Ward, “Sense and Sensibility: The Unbearable Lightness of Certainty”, in Unbelievable: Why We Believe and Why We Don't, London; New York, N.Y.: I.B. Tauris, ISBN 978-1-78076-735-2, page 113:
      What disquieted the Christian friends was not that this was an awful state of affairs theologically. What disquieted them the most was the fact that they were disquieted. As liberal-minded adults they had not expected to be disturbed at all.

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