vex

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See also: VEX

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English vexen, from Old French vexer, from Latin vēxāre (disturb, agitate, annoy). Doublet of quake. Displaced native Old English dreċċan and gremman.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: vĕks, IPA(key): /vɛks/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛks

Verb[edit]

vex (third-person singular simple present vexes, present participle vexing, simple past and past participle vexed or (archaic) vext)

  1. (transitive) To annoy, irritate.
    Synonyms: agitate, irk, irritate
    Billy's professor was vexed by his continued failure to improve his grades.
  2. (transitive) To cause (mental) suffering to; to distress.
    Synonyms: afflict, grame, torment
  3. (transitive, now rare) To trouble aggressively, to harass.
  4. (transitive, rare) To twist, to weave.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be irritated; to fret.
    • 1613, George Chapman, The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois
      Wake when thou would'st wake, fear nought, vex for nought
  6. (transitive) To toss back and forth; to agitate; to disquiet.

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

vex (plural vexes)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) A trouble.

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

vex

  1. Alternative form of wax (wax)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

vex

  1. Alternative form of vexen

Old Norse[edit]

Verb[edit]

vex

  1. first/second/third-person singular present active indicative of vaxa