rancor

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in the 13th century as Middle English rancour, from Old French rancor, from Latin rancor (rancidity, grudge, rancor), from ranceō (be rotten or putrid, stink), from which also English rancid.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor (countable and uncountable, plural rancors)

  1. The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred.
    I could almost see the rancor in his eyes when he challenged me to a fight.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ rancor” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. rancor (the deepest malignity or spite)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ranc(eō) (I am rotten, putrid) +‎ -or (-ness, abstract noun suffix)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor m (genitive rancōris); third declension (Late Latin)

  1. rancidity, stench, rankness
  2. grudge, rancor

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rancor rancōrēs
Genitive rancōris rancōrum
Dative rancōrī rancōribus
Accusative rancōrem rancōrēs
Ablative rancōre rancōribus
Vocative rancor rancōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor

  1. Alternative form of rancour

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor f (oblique plural rancors, nominative singular rancor, nominative plural rancors)

  1. ill-will; negative opinion or intention

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rancor (rancor; putridity).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. (usually uncountable) rancor; grudge (deep seated animosity)
    Ainda guardamos rancor pelo que fizeram conosco.
    We still hold a grudge for what you did to us.
    Synonyms: odiosidade, ressentimento

Related terms[edit]