ire

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ire, yre, from Old English īre, ȳre, īr, ȳr, shortened form of īren (iron). More at iron.

Noun[edit]

ire

  1. (obsolete) Iron.
    • 1806, Richard Polwhele, The Language, Literature, and Literary Characters of Cornwall: with Illustrations from Devonshire, page 25:
      [] 'Tell I'm rud as the smith makes the pieces of ire; []
    • 1842, George Philip Rigney Pulman, Rustic Sketches; being poems on angling ... in the dialect of East Devon, page 55:
      A ire thing, moore smart by haff, / That zeed var off 's za theene 's a laff, / An' zum zes edden' 'xac'ly saff, / Stan's in th' place ee did.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ire, from Old French ire (ire), from Latin īra (wrath, rage), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eysh₂- (to fall upon, act sharply) (compare Old English ofost (haste, zeal), Old Norse eisa (to race forward), Ancient Greek ἱερός (hierós, supernatural, holy), οἶστρος (oîstros, frenzy; gadfly), Avestan𐬀𐬈𐬯𐬨𐬀(aesma, anger), Sanskrit एषति (eṣati, to drive on)). Compare also Middle English irre, erre (anger, wrath), from Old English yrre, ierre, eorre (anger, wrath).

Noun[edit]

ire (uncountable)

  1. Great anger; wrath; keen resentment.
    Synonyms: fury, rage, wrath
    to raise the ire of someone
    • a. 1587, Philippe Sidnei [i.e., Philip Sidney], “(please specify the page number)”, in Fulke Greville, Matthew Gwinne, and John Florio, editors, The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia [The New Arcadia], London: [] [John Windet] for William Ponsonbie, published 1590, →OCLC; republished in Albert Feuillerat, editor, The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia (Cambridge English Classics: The Complete Works of Sir Philip Sidney; I), Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: University Press, 1912, →OCLC:
      She lik'd not his desire; Fain would be free but dreadeth parents ire
    • c. 1591–1592 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene iii]:
      If I digg'd up thy forefathers graves, And hung their rotten coffins up in chains, It could not slake mine ire, nor ease my heart.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IX”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      Or Neptune's ire, or Juno's, that so long Perplex'd the Greek and Cytherea's son.
    • a. 1701 (date written), John Dryden, “The First Book of Homer’s Ilias”, in The Miscellaneous Works of John Dryden, [], volume IV, London: [] J[acob] and R[ichard] Tonson, [], published 1760, →OCLC, page 419:
      For this th' avenging Pow'r employs his darts; / And empties all his quiver in our hearts; / Thus will perſiſt, relentleſs in his ire, / Till the fair ſlave be render'd to her ſire: [...]
    • 2019, Li Huang, James Lambert, “Another Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, →DOI, page 3:
      News of this notice from the university was picked up by local media and had the effect of raising the ire of some citizens who saw this as an attack on ‘Chinese heritage’, which in turn resulted in a rapid apology from the university[.]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ire (third-person singular simple present ires, present participle iring, simple past and past participle ired)

  1. (transitive, rare) To anger, to irritate.
    • 1880, Gleason's Monthly Companion, page 287:
      It doesn't tire a man to put down a carpet so much as it ires him.
    • 1915, Dr. Duncan Eve of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, in the Southern Medical Journal, volume 4, page 279:
      I heard enough from the gentleman who has just taken his seat, and from my friend, Dr. Caldwell, to ire me just a little bit.
    • 1962, Louis L'Amour, Lando, page 3:
      “You have enemies. Is that why you have chosen to leave at this time?”
      It ired me that he should think so, but I held my peace, and when I spoke at last, my voice was mild.
    • 1968, “H. P. Wasson and Company”, in Decisions and Orders of the National Labor Relations Board, volume 170, page 298:
      Only one employee testified as to the interrogation. This was Mary Farley who testified that at the time the research interviewer reached her home she was entertaining company and that she was “ired” by the interruption.
    • 1992 03, Canadian House of Commons, House of Commons Debates, volume 7, page 8115:
      Mr. Gray (Bonaventure–Îles-de-la-Madeleine): Mr. Speaker, [...] Having been in the House of Commons for seven and one-half years and regardless of political stripe, the thing that angers and ires me the most is to hear downtown metro people talking []
    • 2001 August 1, Xan Nowakowski, Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear, iUniverse, →ISBN, page 104:
      [] to give up anorexia. Everyone else deserves their food; it ires me to no end—couldn't write “pissed off,” too juvenile—to hear other girls say, “I shouldn't be eating this.” Shut up, I want to say, you're fucking gorgeous.
    • 2012 September 14, Jim McGahern, A Leg up on the Canon Book 3: Adaptations of Shakespeare's Tragedies and Kyd's the Spanish Tragedy, iUniverse, →ISBN, page 264:
      Instinctively Lear knows she is making some sense, but he has never been treated in this way before and it ires him into calling Goneril a “degenerate bastard” The decrepit old []
    • 2014 March, John A. Tirpak, “Gates versus the Air Force”, in Air Force Magazine, page 56:
      The origin of Gates’ decapitation of the Air Force’s top leadership clearly lie with the F-22. Gates was ired that “every time Moseley and Air Force secretary Mike Wynne came to see me, it was about a new bomber or more F-22s.”
    • 2020, Sarah Hawkswood, River of Sins, Allison and Busby:
      ‘And do not leave Furnaux in a pool of blood, however much he ires you. He has his uses.’
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Dongxiang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Mongolic *ire-, compare Mongolian ирэх (irex), Daur irgw.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ire

  1. to come

Derived terms[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin īra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire f (plural ires)

  1. (archaic, literary or poetic) ire, anger
    Synonym: colère

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.re/
  • Rhymes: -ire
  • Hyphenation: ì‧re

Etymology 1[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

ire f

  1. plural of ira

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ìre (no first-person singular present, no past historic, past participle (regional) ìto, no imperfect, no future, no subjunctive, no imperfect subjunctive, no imperative, auxiliary èssere)

  1. (obsolete, regional, literary) Alternative form of gire (go) [auxiliary essere]
    Synonym: andare
Conjugation[edit]

Including lesser-used forms:

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

īre

  1. present active infinitive of

References[edit]

  • ire”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire (her)

Pronoun[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire (hers)

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire (her)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of ere (ear)

Etymology 4[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 5[edit]

From Old French ire (ire) or Latin īra (wrath, rage). See English ire for more.

Noun[edit]

ire (uncountable)

  1. anger, wrath

References[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French ire < Latin īra.

Noun[edit]

ire f (plural ires)

  1. ire; rage; fury

Descendants[edit]

  • French: ire

Neapolitan[edit]

Verb[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of jire (to go)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire m (definite singular iren, indefinite plural irer, definite plural irene)

  1. person from Ireland, Irishman.
    Synonyms: irlender, irlending

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire m (definite singular iren, indefinite plural irar, definite plural irane)

  1. person from Ireland, Irishman.
    Synonyms: irlendar, irlending

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin īra.

Noun[edit]

ire oblique singularf (oblique plural ires, nominative singular ire, nominative plural ires)

  1. ire, anger, rage

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ire
  • French: ire (now rare)

References[edit]

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronoun[edit]

ire

  1. Alternative form of ira

Declension[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

ire

  1. inflection of irar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: i‧re
  • IPA(key): /ʔiˈɾe/, [ʔɪˈɾɛ]
  • Rhymes: -e

Pronoun[edit]

iré (Baybayin spelling ᜁᜇᜒ) (dialectal, colloquial)

  1. Alternative form of iri: this

Yoruba[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare with oore (blessing) and rere (goodness)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire

  1. good fortune, good luck
    Synonyms: aásìkí, àlùbáríkà
  2. goodness, kindness
    Synonym: rere
    Antonym: ìkà
    ire l'ó pé, ìkà kò péOnly goodness brings a positive result, wickedness does not
  3. A prefix used in unisex given names (ex. Irégbèmí)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Igi ire

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ire

  1. the tree Funtumia elastica

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ìre

  1. blessings
    Synonyms: àlùbáríkà, báríkà, oore, ìbùkún

Etymology 4[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ìré

  1. tail feather
    bákùkọ́ bá ń kọ, jìnnìjìnnnì níí mú ìré ìdí i rẹ̀when a rooster crows, a state of vibration will overwhelm its tail feathers
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

irè

  1. farm produce, harvest
    Synonym: irè oko
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

iré

  1. play, sport
    Synonyms: eré, aré
    wọ́n ń ṣiré erùpẹ̀They were playing with dirt
Derived terms[edit]