despite

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French despit, from Latin dēspectum (looking down on), from dēspiciō (to look down, despise).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈspaɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

Preposition[edit]

despite

  1. In spite of, notwithstanding, regardless of.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 3”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. [], London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, OCLC 216596634:
      So thou through windowes of thine age ſhalt ſee,
      Diſpight of wrinkles this thy goulden time.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 19”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. [], London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, OCLC 216596634:
      Yet doe thy worſt old Time diſpight thy wrong,
      My loue ſhall in my verſe euer liue young.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 7, in The China Governess[1]:
      The highway to the East Coast which ran through the borough of Ebbfield had always been a main road and even now, despite the vast garages, the pylons and the gaily painted factory glasshouses which had sprung up beside it, there still remained an occasional trace of past cultures.
    • 2014 March 3, Zoe Alderton, “‘Snapewives’ and ‘Snapeism’: A Fiction-Based Religion within the Harry Potter Fandom”, in Religions[2], volume 5, number 1, MDPI, DOI:10.3390/rel5010219, pages 219-257:
      Despite personal schisms and differences in spiritual experience, there is a very coherent theology of Snape shared between the wives. To examine this manifestation of religious fandom, I will first discuss the canon scepticism and anti-Rowling sentiment that helps to contextualise the wider belief in Snape as a character who extends beyond book and film.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

despite (countable and uncountable, plural despites)

  1. (obsolete) Disdain, contemptuous feelings, hatred.
  2. (archaic) Action or behaviour displaying such feelings; an outrage, insult.
  3. Evil feeling; malice, spite.
    • 1874, translated by Richard Crawley, Thucydides The Peloponnesian War:
      And for these Corcyraeans—neither receive them into alliance in our despite, nor be their abettors in crime.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

despite (third-person singular simple present despites, present participle despiting, simple past and past participle despited)

  1. (obsolete) To vex; to annoy; to offend contemptuously.

References[edit]

  • despite at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • despite in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams[edit]