lustrum

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin lustrum ‎(period of five years).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lustrum ‎(plural lustra or lustrums)

  1. (Roman religion) A lustration or ceremonial purification of all the ancient Roman people, performed every five years, after the taking of the census.
  2. A period of five years.
    • 1835, Edgar Allan Poe, Morella, Tales of Mystery and Imagination, Folio Society 2007, p. 31:
      Thus passed away two lustra of her life, and, as yet, my daughter remained nameless upon the earth.
    • 1985, John Fowles, A Maggot:
      Q. Now, sir, if you would be so kind as to guess upon his age. A. Forty five years are certain. I would guess a lustrum more.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternation from earlier dustrum (rare), from Ancient Greek δύστρον ‎(dústron) from δύω ‎(dúō, to plunge).

Noun[edit]

lustrum n ‎(genitive lustrī); second declension

  1. bog, morass, place where boars and swine wallow
  2. (chiefly in the plural) den of wild beasts; wood, forest
  3. (chiefly in the plural) (a place of) debauchery
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lustrum lustra
genitive lustrī lustrōrum
dative lustrō lustrīs
accusative lustrum lustra
ablative lustrō lustrīs
vocative lustrum lustra
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lūstrum n ‎(genitive lustrī); second declension

  1. a purificatory sacrifice or lustration performed every five years by the censor
  2. a period of five years
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lūstrum lūstra
genitive lūstrī lūstrōrum
dative lūstrō lūstrīs
accusative lūstrum lūstra
ablative lūstrō lūstrīs
vocative lūstrum lūstra

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • lustrum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lustrum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • LUSTRUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • lustrum in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to complete the censorship (by certain formal purificatory ceremonies = lustro faciendo): lustrum condere (Liv. 1. 44. 2)
  • lustrum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lustrum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Andrew L. Sihler (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, New York, Oxford, Oxford University Press
  • Julius Pokorny (1959), Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, in 3 vols, Bern, München: Francke Verlag
  1. ^ “lustro 3” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, ISBN 978-88-00-20781-2