France

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See also: france and Francë

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Wikivoyage has an article on:

Wikivoyage

Map showing the location of France (in red).

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English France, borrowed from Middle French France, from Old French France, from Latin Francia, from Francī, the name of a Germanic tribe, of unclear (but Proto-Germanic) origin.[1] Compare Frank. Displaced Francland, Francrīċe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

France (plural Frances)

  1. The French Republic, a country in western Europe and member state of the European Union (since 1993), having Paris as its capital city, bounded by Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Andorra, and Spain.
    • 1837, George Sand, Stanley Young, transl., Mauprat[1], Cassandra Editions, published 1977, →ISBN, page 237:
      For a long time the dormouse and polecat had seemed to him overfeeble enemies for his restless valour, even as the granary floor seemed to afford too narrow a field. Every day he read the papers of the previous day in the servants' hall of the houses he visited, and it appeared to him that this war in America, which was hailed as the awakening of the spirit of liberty and justice in the New World, ought to produce a revolution in France.
    • 1998, Shanny Peer, France on Display: Peasants, Provincials, and Folklore, →ISBN, page 2:
      Although scholars have offered different chronologies and causalities for the move toward modernity, most have resolved the paradox of the two Frances by placing them in sequence: "diverse France gave way over time as modern centralized France gathered force."
    • 2012 April 23, Angelique Chrisafis, “François Hollande on top but far right scores record result in French election”, in the Guardian[2]:
      Hollande told cheering supporters in his rural fiefdom of Corrèze in south-west France that he was best-placed to lead France towards change, saying the vote marked a "rejection" of Sarkozy and a "sanction" against his five years in office.
  2. A French surname​, famously held by—
    1. Anatole France, a French poet, journalist, and novelist.

Derived terms[edit]

Meronyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Assamese: ফ্ৰান্স (phranso)
  • Hawaiian: Palani
  • Kalenjin: Frans
  • Kikuyu: Frans
  • Luhya: Frans
  • Meru: Frans
  • Sotho: France
  • Swahili: Ufaransa

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. C. Murray, From Roman to Merovingian Gaul: A Reader. Broadview Press Ltd, 2000. p. 1.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French France, from Old French France, from Medieval Latin or Late Latin Francia, from Francī, the name of a Germanic tribe.

Proper noun[edit]

France f

  1. France (country)
  2. A female given name
  3. A French surname​.

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French France.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

France f

  1. France (a country in Europe)

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French France, from Medieval Latin or Late Latin Francia, from Francī, the name of a Germanic tribe.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

France f

  1. (Jersey) France

Old French[edit]

Excerpt from the Oxford manuscript of The Song of Roland showing 'francs' and 'france' without capital letters.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin or Late Latin Francia, from Francī, the name of a Germanic tribe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

France f (nominative singular France)

  1. France (country)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]