rob

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Rob, røb, ròb, and rób

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English robben, from Anglo-Norman robber, rober, Old French rober (to rob), from Frankish *rōbōn (compare Dutch roven), Old High German roubōn, raubōn ("to rob, steal, plunder"; > Medieval Latin raubare (to rob, steal, plunder)), from Proto-Germanic *raubōną (compare English reave). More at reave.

Verb[edit]

rob (third-person singular simple present robs, present participle robbing, simple past and past participle robbed)

  1. (transitive) To steal from, especially using force or violence.
    He robbed three banks before he was caught.
  2. (transitive) To deprive of, or withhold from, unjustly or injuriously; to defraud.
    The best way to rob a bank is to own one.
  3. (transitive, figuratively, used with "of") To deprive (of).
    Working all day robs me of any energy to go out in the evening.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, chapter I:
      Little disappointed, then, she turned attention to "Chat of the Social World," gossip which exercised potent fascination upon the girl's intelligence. She devoured with more avidity than she had her food those pretentiously phrased chronicles of the snobocracy […] distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
  4. (intransitive, slang) To burgle.
    • 2008, National Public Radio, All Things Considered, Sept 4, 2008
      Her house was robbed.
  5. (intransitive) To commit robbery.
  6. (sports) To take possession of the ball, puck etc. from.
    • 2011 September 28, Tom Rostance, “Arsenal 2-1 Olympiakos”, in BBC Sport:
      Kevin Mirallas then robbed Bacary Sagna to run into the area and draw another save from Szczesny as the Gunners held on to lead at the break.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

French; compare Spanish rob, Italian rob, robbo, Portuguese robe, arrobe, Persian ربودن (present stem: robâ) and also similar in Arabic.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rob (uncountable)

  1. The inspissated juice of ripe fruit, obtained by evaporation of the juice over a fire until it reaches a syrupy consistency. It is sometimes mixed with honey or sugar.
    • 1749, [Thomas Short], “[Of the Symptoms of Fevers, and Their Cure.] 10th, Of Feverish Heat”, in A General Chronological History of the Air, Weather, Seasons, Meteors, &c. in Sundry Places and Different Times; More Particularly for the Space of 250 Years. Together with Some of Their Most Remarkable Effects on Animal (Especially Human) Bodies, and Vegetables. In Two Volumes, volume II, Printed for T[homas] Longman, in Paternoster-Row; and A[ndrew] Millar, in the Strand, OCLC 912982174, page 512–513:
      [I]nſtead of Honey, Rob of Elder, Conſerve of Roſes, or Syrup of Violets; Glyſters, Pedilavia of emollient Decoctions with Nitre; or Elder, Vinegar, or Focus's of the ſame, applied with Sponges behind the Ears, to the Armpits, Groins, Hams, &c. or with Barley-water and a little Roſe-vinegar.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch rob.

Noun[edit]

rob (plural robbe)

  1. seal (pinniped)

Synonyms[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *orbъ (slave). Compare Daco-Romanian rob.

Noun[edit]

rob m (plural roghi, feminine equivalent roabã)

  1. slave

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *orbъ (servant, slave), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃erbʰ- (orphan, child slave or servant).[1]. Compare English robot and Russian рабо́та (rabóta).

Noun[edit]

rob m

  1. (obsolete) slave, serf
    • 1887, Josef Václav Sládek, “Z osudu rukou”, in Selské písně a české znělky[1], line 7:
      Tak všichni jsme z lidí, vládce i rob.
      So we are all of people, both a ruler and a serf.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

rob f

  1. genitive plural of roba

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

rob

  1. second-person singular imperative of robit

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "rab" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, ISBN 978-80-7335-393-3, page 576.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rob m (plural robben, diminutive robbetje n)

  1. seal (sea mammal)

Synonyms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *orbъ (slave), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos (orphan).

Noun[edit]

rob m (plural robi, feminine equivalent roabă)

  1. slave

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From West Slavic dialects, from Proto-Slavic *orbъ (slave), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos (orphan). Compare English robot and Russian рабо́та (rabóta).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rȍb m (Cyrillic spelling ро̏б)

  1. slave

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • rob” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Noun[edit]

rob ? (genitive [please provide], nominative plural [please provide])

  1. border
    rób gozda - edge of the forest

Synonyms[edit]

  1. konec

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rob m (plural robes)

  1. fruit syrup

Related terms[edit]