loos

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See also: Loos and -loos

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lōs (reputation, renown, fame, infamy, rumor, news), from Old French los, from Latin laus (praise, glory, fame, renown). Compare laud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loos (uncountable)

  1. Praise, fame, reputation.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer.
      Hercules that had the grete loos.
    • Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene vi. xii. 12.
      That much he feared, least reprochfull blame
      With foule dishonour him mote blot therefore;
      Besides the losse of so much loos and fame,
      As through the world thereby should glorifie his name.
References[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for loos in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

loos

  1. plural of loo

Anagrams[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *luɨd, from Proto-Celtic *ɸlētos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [loːz]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [luːz]

Adjective[edit]

loos

  1. grey

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *lōs, from Proto-Germanic *lausaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loos (comparative lozer, superlative meest loos or loost)

  1. sly
  2. blank, empty
  3. idle

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of loos
uninflected loos
inflected loze
comparative lozer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial loos lozer het loost
het looste
indefinite m./f. sing. loze lozere looste
n. sing. loos lozer looste
plural loze lozere looste
definite loze lozere looste
partitive loos lozers

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

loos

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lozen
  2. imperative of lozen

Anagrams[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian *lās (attested only in compounds as -lās), from Proto-Germanic *lausaz. More at lease, loose.

Adjective[edit]

loos

  1. empty