Sol

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Sōl.

Proper noun[edit]

Sol

  1. (poetic, science fiction) The Sun, the star orbited by the Earth.
  2. (Roman mythology) The sun god; equivalent of the Greek Helios. Brother of Luna and Aurora.
  3. (Norse mythology) The sun goddess.
  4. (nonce word) A male given name
    • 2017 March 1, Marc Waddington, “How dad’s bionic arm invention is changing son’s life & prosthetics”, in Daily Post, № 51,073, page 6/2:
      Sol (named after the solar eclipse on the day of his birth) was born in March 2015 with an undetected clot in his upper left arm.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Sol (uncountable)

  1. (heraldry, rare) Or (gold), in the postmedieval practice of blazoning the tinctures of certain sovereigns' (especially British monarchs') coats as planets.
    • 1693, Richard Blome, The Art of Heraldry, in two parts ... second edition ..., pages 76-77:
      4. Luna, a Mantle of Estate, Mars doubled Ermine, ouched Sol, garnished with Strings fastned thereunto fretways dependent, and tasselled of the same. [...] These Arms do belong to the Town of Beckbock in Wales. 5. Jupiter, a Mace of Majestry in Bend Sol.
    • 1718, Samuel Kent, The Grammar of Heraldry [...] Second Edition:
      George [...] Ist. Mars, three Lions passant guardant in Pale Sol, for the Arms of England, Impal'd with Scotland, i.e. Sol, a Lion rampant within a double Tressure counterflory Mars. 2d. Jupiter, three Fleurs de Lis Sol, for the Arms of France. 3d. Jupiter, an Irish Harp Sol, stringed Luna, for Ireland. 4th. Seme party per Pale, and per Chevron enarche, in the Ist Mars, two Lions passant guardant Sol, for Brunswick. In the 2d Partition Sol, semy of Hearts Mars, and a Lion rampant Jupiter, armed and langued of the First, for Luneburg.
    • 1735, Francis Nichols, The Irish Compendium [...] vol. III of the British Compendium, second edition, page 80:
      8. Tierce in Mantle, first Mars, two Lions passant-guardant in pale, Sol, for Brunswick; 2d Sol, Semi of Hearts proper, a Lion rampant Jupiter, for Lunenburgh;
    • 1737, Benjamin Martin, Bibliotheca Technologica: Or, a Philological Library, page 631:
      ARMS. QUARTERLY, in the first grand Quarter Mars, three Lions passant-guardant in Pale, Sol; the Imperial Ensigns of England, impaled with the Royal Arms of Scotland, which are Sol, a Lion rampant within a double Tressure flower'd and counterflower'd with Fleurs-de-lis, Mars. The second Quarter is the Royal Arms of France, viz. Jupiter, three Fleurs-de-lis, Sol. The third, the Ensign of Ireland, which is, Jupiter, an Harp Sol, stringed Luna.
  2. (obsolete, alchemy, chemistry) Gold.

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening.

Proper noun[edit]

Sol

  1. A diminutive of the male given name Solomon.
    • 1846 October 1 – 1848 April 1, Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1848, →OCLC:
      “Chock full o’ science,” said the radiant Captain, “as ever he was! Sol Gills, Sol Gills, what have you been up to, for this many a long day, my ould boy?”

Anagrams[edit]

Galician[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sol m

  1. the Sun, Sol

Related terms[edit]

German[edit]

German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist where all note names were taken from.

Noun[edit]

Sol n (strong, genitive Sols, plural Sole)

  1. (music) sol, the fifth step in the solfège scale of C, preceded by fa and followed by la.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English sol.

Noun[edit]

Sol n (strong, genitive Sols, plural Sole)

  1. (physical chemistry) sol, a type of colloid in which a solid is dispersed in a liquid.
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The same word as sōl (sun), taken as a proper noun.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sōl m sg (genitive Sōlis); third declension

  1. (astronomy) Alternative letter-case form of sōl (the Sun)
  2. (Roman mythology) Sol (the sun god)
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.581–582:
      crīmine nox vacua est; Sōlem dē virgine raptā
      cōnsule, quī lātē facta diurna videt.
      Night is without fault. About the maiden who’s been abducted: Consult the Sun,
      who beholds far and wide that which is done by day.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Sōl
Genitive Sōlis
Dative Sōlī
Accusative Sōlem
Ablative Sōle
Vocative Sōl

References[edit]

  • Sol in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sōl.

Noun[edit]

Sol (uncountable)

  1. the Sun.

Plautdietsch[edit]

Noun[edit]

Sol f (plural Sole)

  1. sole (of a shoe)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sōlem (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Proper noun[edit]

Sol m

  1. (astronomy) the Sun

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsol/ [ˈsol]
  • Rhymes: -ol
  • Syllabification: Sol

Etymology 1[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sol m

  1. the Sun

Etymology 2[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sol f

  1. Clipping of Soledad.

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sol c (genitive Sols)

  1. (Norse mythology) Norse god Sol

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]