ploy

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: pløy

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plɔɪ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly from a shortened form of employ or deploy. Or from earlier ploye, from Middle English, borrowed from Middle French ployer (compare modern plier), from Latin plicāre.

Noun[edit]

ploy (countable and uncountable, plural ploys)

  1. A tactic, strategy, or gimmick.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. [] Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster. Clever financial ploys are what have made billionaires of the industry’s veterans. “Operational improvement” in a portfolio company has often meant little more than promising colossal bonuses to sitting chief executives if they meet ambitious growth targets. That model is still prevalent today.
    The free T-shirt is really a ploy to get you inside to see their sales pitch.
  2. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) Sport; frolic.
  3. (obsolete) Employment.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably abbreviated from deploy.

Verb[edit]

ploy (third-person singular simple present ploys, present participle ploying, simple past and past participle ployed)

  1. (military) To form a column from a line of troops on some designated subdivision.
    • 1881, Thomas Wilhelm, A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer
      Troops drawn up so as to show an extended front, with slight depth, are said to be deployed; when the depth is considerable and the front comparatively small, they are said to be in ployed formation.
Antonyms[edit]

References[edit]

ploy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Sranan Tongo[edit]

Verb[edit]

ploy

  1. To flex.
  2. To curve.