oor

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Oor, oor-, and òòr

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

From Dutch oor (ear), from Middle Dutch ore, from Old Dutch ōra, from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-.

Noun[edit]

oor (plural ore)

  1. ear

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch over, from Middle Dutch over, from Old Dutch *ovar, from Proto-Germanic *uber, from Proto-Indo-European *upér, from *upo.

Preposition[edit]

oor

  1. over, above
  2. beyond, across
  3. about, concerning
  4. because of
Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

oor

  1. because
Synonyms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ore, from Old Dutch ōra, from Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-. Compare German Ohr, West Frisian ear, English ear, Danish øre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /oːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: oor
  • Rhymes: -oːr

Noun[edit]

oor n (plural oren, diminutive oortje n)

  1. ear
  2. handle (of cup, mug)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: oor
  • Jersey Dutch: ôr
  • Negerhollands: oor, hoor, ho

Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Low German Ohr

Noun[edit]

oor

  1. ear

See also[edit]

  • German Low German: Or

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English houre (or via Anglo-Norman), from Latin hōra. Certainly did not descend from Old Irish úar, but both the Manx and Old Irish terms are ultimately from the same source.

Noun[edit]

oor f (genitive singular oor, plural ooryn)

  1. hour

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English hour

Noun[edit]

oor (plural oors)

  1. hour

Pronoun[edit]

oor

  1. our

Solon[edit]

Noun[edit]

oor

  1. steam

References[edit]

  • Bayarma Khabtagaeva, Dagur Elements in Solon Evenki, 2012.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English oure, from Old English ūre, from Proto-West Germanic *unsar.

Noun[edit]

oor

  1. our

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith