aes

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See also: AES, áes, äes, -aes, a**es, äs, and æs

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

aes

  1. (rare) plural of a, the name of the letter A.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, The Epic
      Mouthing out his hollow oes and aes, Deep-chested music.
    • 1856, Goold Brown, The First Lines of English Grammar, page 10:
      These names [] may form regular plurals; thus, Aes, Bees, Cees, Dees, Ees, Effs, Gees, Aitches, Ies, Jays, Kays, Ells, Ems, Ens, Oes, Pees, Kues, Ars, Esses, Tees, Ues, Vees, Double-ues, Exes, Wies, Zees.

Anagrams[edit]


Bislama[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ice.

Noun[edit]

aes

  1. ice

Breton[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aes

  1. easy

Antonyms[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese eles and Portuguese este..

Pronoun[edit]

aes

  1. they
  2. these

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia la

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *aos, early *ajos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éyos.

Cognate with English ore.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aes n (genitive aeris); third declension

  1. money, pay, fee, fare
  2. copper, bronze, brass
    alicuius ex aere imagothe bronze statue of someone
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 8.445:
      Fluit aes riuis aurique metallum, uulnificusque chalybs uasta fornace liquescit.
      Bronze and golden ore flowed in streams, and steel, that deals wounds, melted in a vast furnace.
  3. payment, debt

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aes aera
Genitive aeris aerum
Dative aerī aeribus
Accusative aes aera
Ablative aere aeribus
Vocative aes aera

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • aes”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • aes”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aes in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • aes in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • coined money; bullion: aes (argentum) signatum
    • to incur debts: aes alienum (always in sing.) facere, contrahere
    • to incur debts on a large scale: grande, magnum (opp. exiguum) aes alienum conflare
    • to get into debt: incidere in aes alienum
    • to be in debt: aes alienum habere
    • to pay one's debts: aes alienum dissolvere, exsolvere
    • to engrave a law upon a brazen tablet: legem in aes incīdere
    • (ambiguous) to breathe the air: aera spiritu ducere
    • (ambiguous) to be in debt: in aere alieno esse
    • (ambiguous) to be deeply in debt: aere alieno obrutum, demersum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have pressing debts: aere alieno oppressum esse
    • (ambiguous) to get out of debt: ex aere alieno exire
    • (ambiguous) to get out of debt: aere alieno liberari
    • (ambiguous) to be fined 10,000 asses: decem milibus aeris damnari
  • aes”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aes”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Dizionario Latino, Olivetti

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch ās, from Proto-Germanic *ēsaz.

Noun[edit]

âes n

  1. carrion
  2. bait

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: aas
  • Limburgish: aos

Further reading[edit]

  • aes”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “aes”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse eisa (glowing embers).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aes (plural aeses)

  1. (Shetland) blazing fire

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aes

  1. plural of a