syn

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See also: sýn, syn-, -syn, and

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Greek συν- (syn-, with, together), having the same function as co- (synthesis, synoptic).

Adjective[edit]

syn (not comparable)

  1. (chemistry) That has a torsion angle between 0° and 90°.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of synonym.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn (plural syns)

  1. Abbreviation of synonym.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of synthetic.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

syn (comparative more syn, superlative most syn)

  1. Abbreviation of synthetic.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

syn

  1. Obsolete form of sy. ('his')

Particle[edit]

syn

  1. Obsolete form of se.
  2. Obsolete form of s'n.

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Czech syn, from Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sū́ˀnus, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɪn]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: syn
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Noun[edit]

syn m anim

  1. son

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • syn in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • syn in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sýn, cognate to se.

Noun[edit]

syn

  1. vision, faculty of sight
    Hun har nedsat syn på det højre øje.
    She has reduced vision in the right eye.
  2. a way of perceiving something
    De havde et ganske andet syn på sandsynlighedsfeltsbegrebet.
    They had quite another view of the concept of the probability field.
    Sikke dog et forskruet og forældet menneskesyn!
    What a twisted and antiquated view of humans!

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn

  1. vision (mystical event)
    Shamanen påstår at have fået et syn.
    The shaman claims to have received a vision.

Declension[edit]


Kashubian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *synъ.

Noun[edit]

syn ?

  1. son

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sū́ˀnus, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn m (diminutive synk)

  1. son

Declension[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928), “syn”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “syn”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sýn

Noun[edit]

syn n (definite singular synet, indefinite plural syn or syner, definite plural syna or synene, genitive syne)

  1. sight, eyesight, vision (ability to see)
  2. a sight
    et vakkert syna beautiful sight
    komme til syne [old genitive form]come into sight
  3. a vision or hallucination
  4. a premonition
  5. a view (opinion)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sýn

Noun[edit]

syn n (definite singular synet, indefinite plural syn, definite plural syna)
syn f (definite singular syna, indefinite plural syner, definite plural synene)

  1. sight, eyesight, vision (ability to see)
  2. a sight
    eit vakkert syn - a beautiful sight
  3. (especially feminine) a vision
  4. (feminine plural only) hallucinations
  5. a view (opinion)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

syn

  1. imperative of syna

References[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sjón, from Proto-Germanic *siuniz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȳn f

  1. sight, ability to see
  2. appearance

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Swedish: syn

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sū́ˀnus, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn m pers (diminutive synek)

  1. son

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

nouns

Further reading[edit]

  • syn in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • syn in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sū́ˀnus, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn m (genitive singular syna, nominative plural synovia, genitive plural synov, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. son

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • syn in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish sȳn, from Old Norse sýn, sjón, from Proto-Germanic *siuniz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syn c

  1. sight (ability to see), vision
  2. a sight, a view
  3. a vision, a revelation (of the future)

Declension[edit]

Declension of syn 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative syn synen syner synerna
Genitive syns synens syners synernas

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Upper Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *synъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *sū́ˀnus, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Noun[edit]

syn m

  1. son

Declension[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian sīn, from Proto-West Germanic *sīn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

syn

  1. his (third-person singular masculine possessive determiner)
  2. its (third-person singular neuter possessive determiner)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • syn”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011