syna

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See also: sýna

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syna

  1. inflection of syn:
    1. genitive and accusative singular
    2. nominative dual

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

syna n

  1. definite plural of syn

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (of definite singular) synet
  • (of definite plural) synene

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

syna n, f

  1. definite feminine singular of syn
  2. definite neuter plural of syn

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sýna.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

syna (present tense syner, past tense synte, past participle synt, passive infinitive synast, present participle synande, imperative syn)

  1. to show
    • 1971, Olav H. Hauge, "T'ao Ch'ien":
      Kjem T'ao Ch'ien på vitjing ein dag, vil eg syna han kissebærtrei og aplane mine []
      If T'ao Ch'ien comes visiting one day, I will show him my cherry trees and apples []
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

syna

  1. genitive singular of syn
  2. accusative singular of syn

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

syna (present synar , preterite synade , supine synat , imperative syna )

  1. to look closely at something
  2. (card games) to call

Conjugation[edit]


Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Võro[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *sana.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

syna (genitive syna, partitive synna)

  1. word

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Waimiri-Atroari[edit]

Noun[edit]

syna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Languages of hunter-gatherers and their neighbors, citing Ana Carla dos Santos Bruno, Waimiri-Atroari grammar: some phonological, morphological, and syntactic aspects (2003, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Arizona)
  • William Milliken, The Ethnobotany of the Waimiri Atroari Indians of Brazil (1992), page 19