Dom

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening.

Proper noun[edit]

Dom

  1. A unisex given name, a form of Dominic or Dominique.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Portuguese dom, and its source, Latin dominus.

Noun[edit]

Dom (plural Doms)

  1. A title given to royalty and high-ranking ecclesiastics in Portugal and Brazil.
  2. A title given to Roman Catholic monastic dignitaries.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Hindi [Term?], from Sanskrit डोम (ḍoma).

Noun[edit]

Dom (plural Doms)

  1. A caste (or member of this caste) in Indian society, originally comprising drummers or travelling musicians and now generally referring to a Dalit subcaste responsible for the cremation and disposal of dead bodies.
    • 2023, Radhika Iyengar, Fire on the Ganges, Fourth Estate, page 2:
      Chand Ghat, where Dolly lives, is primarily a Dom neighbourhood, home to a small community of corpse-burners.

Etymology 4[edit]

Related to Rom and Lom.

Proper noun[edit]

Dom

  1. An Indo-Aryan ethnic group, living mainly in the Middle East and North Africa.

Anagrams[edit]

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Thum (obsolete since early 19th c.)

Etymology[edit]

15th-century alteration (see below) of older Thum, from Middle High German and Old High German tuom, from Proto-West Germanic *dōm (whence Old Dutch duom, Middle Low German dôm), from Medieval Latin domus (literally house). The use probably goes back to domus episcopatus/episcopalis (house of the bishopric).[1][2] An alternative theory derives it from domus ecclesiae (church house), after Ancient Greek οἶκος τῆς ἐκκλησίας (oîkos tês ekklēsías).[3]

The modern alteration Dom follows Middle French dome, from Italian duomo, from the Latin. It was probably reinforced by the inherited Middle Low German form (see above).[4] Thum survived longest in the south.[5] The Dutch cognate dom was similarly influenced by French.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doːm/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -oːm

Noun[edit]

Dom m (strong, genitive Doms or Domes, plural Dome)

  1. cathedral (church serving as seat of a bishop, by extension, any large church)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dom“, in Pfeifer, Wolfgang et al.: Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Deutschen (1993), digitalisierte Version im Digitalen Wörterbuch der Deutschen Sprache.
  2. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009), “dom1”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press
  3. ^ Dom, Duden.
  4. ^ Paul, Hermann: Deutsche Grammatik, vol. I, Halle a.S., 1916, p. 333, 335.
  5. ^ Adelung, Johann Christoph: Grammatisch-Kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart, vol. I, Leipzig, 1793, col. 1513.

Further reading[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: Dom

Noun[edit]

Dom m (plural Dons)

  1. honorific title usually used before a man's name, equivalent to Spanish Don; it has historically been used by members of the high nobility in Portugal and Brazil
    Synonym: (abbreviation) D.

Related terms[edit]

Saterland Frisian[edit]

n'Dom.

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian dam, from Proto-West Germanic *damm. Cognates include West Frisian dam and German Damm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Dom m (plural Domme)

  1. dam

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “Dom”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN