-dom

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -dom, from Old English -dōm (-dom: state, condition, power, dominion, authority, property, right, office, quality, suffix), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz.

Cognate with Scots -dom (-dom), North Frisian -dom (-dom), West Frisian -dom (-dom), Dutch -dom (-dom), Low German -dom (-dom), German -tum (-dom), Swedish -dom (-dom) -döme (-dom), Norwegian -dom (-dom), Icelandic -dómur (-dom), Norwegian Bokmål -dømme, Norwegian Nynorsk -døme. Same as Old English dōm (doom, judgment, sentence, condemnation, ordeal, judicial sentence, decree, ordinance, law, custom; justice, equity; direction, ruling, governing, command; might, power, dominion, supremacy, majesty, glory, magnificence, splendor, reputation, honor, praise, dignity, authority; state, condition). More at doom.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Forming nouns denoting the condition or state of the suffixed word.
    boredom, freedom, martyrdom, stardom
    • 1995, Isabel Fonseca, Bury Me Standing, Vintage 2007, p. 74:
      there always seemed to be one outrageous beauty: an angel who would have been forced into indentured topmodeldom had she been found on a Paris bus; or a wavy-lipped, chisel-chinned, almond-eyed boy-warrior out of the Iliad, as beautiful as humans come.
  2. Forming nouns denoting the domain or jurisdiction of the suffixed word.
    Christendom, fiefdom, kingdom, Saxondom
  3. Forming nouns — usually nonce words — denoting the set of all examples of the suffixed word.
    catdom, dogdom, furrydom, gothdom
    • 2011, Caitlin Moran, The Times, 19 Mar 2011:
      It is only the English language that has let the cabbage down – giving it, quite frankly, the ugliest name in all of veg-dom.
  4. (fandom slang) Forming nouns denoting the fandom of the suffixed word.
    Potterdom, stfdom

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse -dómr.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Indicates a condition, situation or period.
  2. Indicates a religion, teaching or similar.

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch -dom, from Old Dutch -duom, from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz. Cognate with English -dom, German -tum.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-dom m

  1. belonging to a domain or territory (e.g. groothertogdom (grandduchy); this sense is no longer productive)
  2. quality or condition of the adjective stem (e.g. eigendom less productive than suffixes like -heid)

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German -dôm, from Old Saxon -dōm, from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz. Cognate with English -dom, Dutch -dom, German -tum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /doːm/, /doʊ̯m/, /dɔʊ̯m/

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. belonging to a domain or territory (e.g. Hartogdom (duchy); this sense is no longer productive)
  2. quality or condition of the adjective stem (e.g. Riekdom less productive than suffixes like -heit)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse -dómr.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Suffix used to form nouns out of adjectives, meaning the quality, property or condition of the adjective.

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse -dómr.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Suffix used to form nouns out of adjectives, meaning the quality, property or condition of the adjective.

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dōm (state, condition, authority, jurisdiction).

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-dōm

  1. Belonging to a domain or jurisdiction.
  2. Condition or quality.

Derived terms[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dōm (state, condition, authority, jurisdiction).

Suffix[edit]

-dōm

  1. (belonging to a) domain or jurisdiction
  2. condition or quality

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse -dómr.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. -hood, -ledge, -ness; making a noun (representing a state) from an adjective or noun
    rik (rich) + ‎-dom → ‎rikedom (wealth, fortune)
    ung (young) + ‎-dom → ‎ungdom (youth)
    barn (child) + ‎-dom → ‎barndom (childhood)

Usage notes[edit]

  • These nouns don't double the m in definite or plural forms, e.g. rikedomen, ungdomar. This is the same for the noun dom (judgement, verdict).

Derived terms[edit]


See also[edit]