mody

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Mody

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

mode +‎ -y

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mody (comparative more mody, superlative most mody)

  1. (dated) modish; fashionable

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “mody”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.)

Anagrams[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English mōdiġ, from Proto-Germanic *mōdagaz; equivalent to mode +‎ -y.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mody (comparative modyere)

  1. Boastful, conceited, arrogant, or vain; displaying pride.
  2. Furious; causing conflict, war, or strife.
  3. Courageous, mighty, glorious; praiseworthy.
  4. (rare) Showing sadness; mournful, upset, crying, dreary.
  5. (rare) Over-the-top, ornamented.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: moody
  • Scots: muidie

References[edit]

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.dɨ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔdɨ
  • Syllabification: mo‧dy

Noun[edit]

mody f

  1. inflection of moda:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Silesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Polish młody.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔdɨ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔdɨ
  • Syllabification: mo‧dy

Adjective[edit]

mody

  1. young
    Antonym: stary

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

noun

Further reading[edit]