prestige

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See also: Prestige

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prestige (illusion, fascination, enchantment, prestige), from Latin praestigium (a delusion, an illusion). Despite the phonetic similarities and the old meaning of “delusion, illusion, trick”, the word has a different root than prestidigitator (conjurer) and prestidigitation.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɹɛsˈtiː(d)ʒ/, /pɹəˈstiː(d)ʒ/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛs.tɪdʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːʒ, -iːdʒ

Noun[edit]

prestige (usually uncountable, plural prestiges)

  1. The quality of how good the reputation of something or someone is, how favourably something or someone is regarded.
    Oxford has a university of very high prestige.
  2. (obsolete, often preceded by "the") Delusion; illusion; trick.
    • 1811, William Warburton, Richard Hurd, editor, The works of the Right Reverend William Warburton, D.D., Lord Bishop of Gloucester, volume the ninth, London: Luke Hansard & Sons, OCLC 7605701, page 121:
      That faith which, we are told, was founded on a rock, impregnable to the assaults of men and demons; to the sophisms of infidelity, and the prestiges of imposture!

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prestige (not comparable)

  1. (sociolinguistics, of a linguistic form) Regarded as relatively prestigious; often, considered the standard language or language variety, or a part of such a variety.
    • 1971, John Gumperz, “Formal and informal standards in Hindi regional language area”, in Language in Social Groups, Stanford: Stanford University Press, →ISBN, page 48:
      Furthermore there is in each area a well recognized standard, known by a single name, which although often linguistically distinct from local dialects, has served as the prestige form for some time.
    • 1981, Jerzy Rubach, Cyclic Phonology and Palatalization in Polish and English, Warsaw: Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, OCLC 9557130, page 57:
      The 3rd person plural ending is phonetically [ow̃] or [om], depending on the dialect. However, [ow̃] is the prestige form.

Verb[edit]

prestige (third-person singular simple present prestiges, present participle prestiging, simple past and past participle prestiged)

  1. To start over at an earlier point in a video game with some type of bonus or reward.
    • 2002 July 15, Mark Green, “help in creating prestige class: Sharpshooter”, in rec.games.frp.dnd, Usenet:
      This seriously depends on the prerequisites, but most chars will already have a +1 bow by the time they're thinking of prestiging - or will this stack with the equipment's magic?
    • 2010 December 3, Chris Stevens, “PWG 20101203 - The deja double”, in uk.games.video.misc, Usenet:
      I'm going to try to stop and move onto a different game once I've prestiged, but the credits/equipment buying arrangement will make prestiging much less of a crippling shock than in previous games, so I may well be stuck playing it for a long time to come.
    • 2013, Brent Kice, “Perceptions of Control: Open World Formats v. Online Multiplayer First Person Shooters”, in Matthew Wysocki, editor, Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming, McFarland & Company, page 154:
      However, Treyarch crafts a narrative of leveling up when a player attempts to prestige. The player is stripped of most un-lockable game features and must re-earn them with the ability to repeat this process 15 times. Prestiging allows the empty narrative of online multiplayer first person shooters to continue on a much grander scale.
    • 2014 April 1, Man of Kent, “Monday, innit”, in uk.games.video.misc, Usenet:
      Reached level 50 and prestiged which I have never had the inclination to do in any game before.
    • 2018, Adam Kramarzewski; Ennio De Nucci, Practical Game Design, Packt, page 420:
      Prestiging itself is a concept popularized by Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, where players can reset their in-game progress after reaching the maximum experience level, and receive a cosmetic token in exchange.

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French prestige, from Latin praestigium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prestige n (uncountable)

  1. prestige

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: prestise

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin praestigium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prestige m (plural prestiges)

  1. prestige
    de prestigeprestigious

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prestige.

Noun[edit]

prestige c

  1. prestige

Declension[edit]

Declension of prestige 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative prestige prestigen
Genitive prestiges prestigens

Related terms[edit]