tide

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See also: Tide, tìde, and -tide

English[edit]

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Boats at low tide (periodic change of sea level).

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tyde, tide, tyd, tid, from Old English tīd (time), from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz (time), from Proto-Indo-European *déh₂itis (time), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₂y- (to divide). Related to time.

Noun[edit]

tide (plural tides)

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  1. The periodic change of the sea level, particularly when caused by the gravitational influence of the sun and the moon.
  2. A stream, current or flood.
    Synonyms: inflood, inflooding, inflow, inflowing, influx
  3. (chronology, obsolete, except in liturgy) Time, notably anniversary, period or season linked to an ecclesiastical feast.
  4. (regional, archaic) A time.
    The doctor's no good this tide.
  5. (regional, archaic) A point or period of time identified or described by a qualifier (found in compounds).
    Eventide, noontide, morrowtide, nighttide, moon-tide, harvest-tide, wintertide, summertide, springtide, autumn-tide etc.,.
  6. (mining) The period of twelve hours.
  7. Something which changes like the tides of the sea.
  8. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.
  9. (obsolete) Violent confluence
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

tide (third-person singular simple present tides, present participle tiding, simple past and past participle tided)

  1. (transitive) To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.
    • 1623, Owen Feltham, Resolves: Divine, Moral, Political
      They are tided down the stream.
  2. (intransitive) To pour a tide or flood.
    The ocean tided most impressively.
  3. (intransitive, nautical) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English tiden, tide, from Old English tīdan (to happen).

Verb[edit]

tide (third-person singular simple present tides, present participle tiding, simple past and past participle tided)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To happen, occur.
    • 1779, David Dalrymple, Annals of Scotland[2], volume II, page 121:
      I wit not what may tide us here
Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

tide

  1. Alternative form of tyde (time)

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tide

  1. Alternative form of tydy

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tide m or f

  1. dative form of tid

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

tide f

  1. dative form of tid

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīde

  1. inflection of tīd:
    1. accusative/genitive/dative singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

See also[edit]

Seasons in Old English · tīde (layout · text)
lencten (spring) sumor (summer) hærfest (autumn) winter (winter)

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English today.

Adverb[edit]

tide

  1. today