influx

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin īnflūxus (inflow; influence), from īnfluō (flow or run into).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnˌflʌks/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

influx (countable and uncountable, plural influxes)

  1. A flow inward or into something; a coming in.
    Synonyms: infusion, intromission, introduction, importation
    I'll buy a new computer when I get an influx of cash.
    • 1871, John Earle, The Philology of the English Tongue
      the general influx of Greek into modern languages
    • 2021 January 13, Dr Joseph Brennan, “Spectacular funiculars”, in RAIL, issue 922, page 53:
      By the 1880s, the pretty harbour village of Lynmouth was enjoying an influx of holidaymakers brought by paddle steamers from the likes of Bristol and Swansea.
  2. That which flows or comes in.
  3. (obsolete) influence; power.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      A continued influx of the Divine Goodness

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for influx in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French influx.

Noun[edit]

influx n (plural influxuri)

  1. influx

Declension[edit]