tid

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See also: TID, tíd, and tíð

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old English tēdre, tȳdre (weak; tender). More at tidder.

Adjective[edit]

tid (comparative more tid, superlative most tid)

  1. (obsolete) tender; soft; nice

Derived terms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tid in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tíð, from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tid c (singular definite tiden, plural indefinite tider)

  1. time

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

tid

  1. rafsi of tcidu.

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian tīd, from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time). Cognates include Föhr-Amrum North Frisian tidj West Frisian tiid.

Noun[edit]

tid f

  1. (Mooring dialect) time
Dåt grutst part foon daheere ferteelinge ståmt üt e tid twasche 1932 än 1936.
Most of the story takes place during the time between 1932 and 1936.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tíð (time), from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time).

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

tid f, m (definite singular tida or tiden, indefinite plural tider, definite plural tidene)

  1. time
  2. an age or era

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tíð (time), from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tid f (definite singular tida, indefinite plural tider, definite plural tidene) (dative form tide)

  1. time
  2. an age or era

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time). Cognate with Old Frisian tīd, Old Saxon tīd, Old Dutch tīt, Old High German zīt, and Old Norse tíð; see also modern cognates at tide.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīd f (nominative plural tīda or tīde)

  1. Time as a defined period or span, particularly:
    1. A tide, a fourth of the day or night
    2. An hour, a twelfth of the day or night
    3. A season, a fourth of the year
    4. (especially in plural) An age, an era
  2. The hour, the moment determined by a sundial or other device marking the division between the tides or hours
    nōntīd
    nones
  3. (Christianity) The religious service held at a canonical hour, four of which were equivalent to the daylight tides
  4. The season, the favorable or proper period for an action, especially with regard to farming or (Christianity) the holy seasons of the liturgical year.
    Eāstertīd
    Eastertime
  5. The time, the hour, the favorable, proper, or allotted moment for an action or event, the occasion when something can or ought to be done.
    bedtīd
    bedtime
  6. A commemoration; an anniversary; a festival, especially a saint's day.
  7. (grammar) Tense, the time indicated by the form of a verb.

Usage note[edit]

Frequently suffixed to a period of day or season (ǣfentīd, wintertīd) to show consideration of it as a span of time, as modern English -time (evening time, wintertime) or archaic English -tide (eventide, wintertide).

Although tīd was used for natural cycles of time, it was apparently not used for the cycles of the ocean and other large bodies of water until Middle English (c. 1340). The Old English terms for the tide were instead flōd and ebba.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish tīþ (time), Old Norse tíð, from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from Proto-Indo-European *dī- (time).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tid c

  1. (uncountable) time
  2. time, period, era

Declension[edit]

Declension of tid 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tid tiden tider tiderna
Genitive tids tidens tiders tidernas

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

tid (plural tids)

  1. instruction (act of teaching, or that which is taught)

Declension[edit]