flod

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: flóð

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish floth, from Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus, from *pleh₃(w)- (flow). Compare Swedish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod c (singular definite floden, plural indefinite floder)

  1. river
  2. (uncountable) high tide

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English flōd, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod (plural flodes)

  1. A waterbody or water in general (opposed to land):
    1. A river; a waterbody that moves in one direction.
    2. A lake or ocean; a large open body of water.
  2. A flood; a massive or momentous flooding.
  3. The rise or peak of the tide; rising tide.
  4. The movement of the sea (e.g. tide or flow)
  5. (figuratively) Something that flows or issues in abundance.
  6. (figuratively) A rise, growing or increasing.

Usage notes[edit]

This word often appears in rhyming collocations with good.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse flóð, compare with German Flut.

Noun[edit]

flod f, m (definite singular floda or floden, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a flood, deluge
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German vlot and German Fluß (now Fluss).

Noun[edit]

flod m (definite singular floden, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a large river
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse flóð

Noun[edit]

flod f (definite singular floda, indefinite plural floder, definite plural flodene)

  1. a flood, deluge
  2. flood tide (incoming tide), high tide
  3. a large river

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • (tide) flo (Bokmål)

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

The word flōd is found, as flodu, on the early 8th century Franks Casket, one of the oldest monuments of Old English.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus, from *pleh₃(w)- (flow). Cognate with Old Saxon flōd, Old Dutch fluot (Dutch vloed), Old High German fluot (German Flut), Old Norse flóð (Icelandic flóð), Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flōd m (nominative plural flōdas)

  1. flowing of the tide
  2. river, stream; water as opposed to land
  3. flood, deluge

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus, from *pleh₃(w)- (flow). Compare Old English flōd, Old Dutch fluot, Old High German fluot, Old Norse flóð, Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus).

Noun[edit]

flōd m

  1. river, stream
  2. flood, deluge

Declension[edit]



Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pléh₃tus. Compare Danish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fluːd/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

flod c

  1. a river
    Synonyms: å, älv, ström
  2. a flood
    Synonym: översvämning
  3. a high tide
    Antonyms: ebb, lågvatten
    Synonym: högvatten

Usage notes[edit]

  • Rivers and streams in Scandinavia are named älv (-älven), å (-ån), ström (e.g. Göta älv, Lule älv, Svartån, Motala ström, Norrström), while flod is used to refer to rivers abroad.

Declension[edit]

Declension of flod 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative flod floden floder floderna
Genitive flods flodens floders flodernas

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod (plural flods)

  1. frost

Declension[edit]