deluge

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See also: Deluge and déluge

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English deluge, from Old French deluge, alteration of earlier deluvie, from Latin dīluvium, from lavō (wash)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɛl.juːdʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɛl.ju(d)ʒ/, /dəˈlu(d)ʒ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

deluge (plural deluges)

  1. A great flood or rain.
    The deluge continued for hours, drenching the land and slowing traffic to a halt.
  2. An overwhelming amount of something; anything that overwhelms or causes great destruction.
    The rock concert was a deluge of sound.
    • Milton
      A fiery deluge fed / With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
    • Lowell
      The little bird sits at his door in the sun, / Atilt like a blossom among the leaves, / And lets his illumined being o'errun / With the deluge of summer it receives.
  3. (Military engineering) A damage control system on navy warships which is activated by excessive temperature within the Vertical Launching System.
    • NAVEDTRA 14324A
      In the event of a restrained firing or canister overtemperature condition, the deluge system sprays cooling water within the canister until the overtemperature condition no longer exists.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

deluge (third-person singular simple present deluges, present participle deluging, simple past and past participle deluged)

  1. (transitive) To flood with water.
    Some areas were deluged with a month's worth of rain in 24 hours.
  2. (transitive) To overwhelm.
    After the announcement, they were deluged with requests for more information.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN

See also[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French deluge, from Latin dīluvium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛːliu̯dʒ(ə)/

Noun[edit]

deluge (Late ME)

  1. A deluge; a massive flooding or raining.
  2. (rare, figuratively) Any cataclysmic or catastrophic event.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dīluvium.

Noun[edit]

deluge m (oblique plural deluges, nominative singular deluges, nominative plural deluge)

  1. large flood

Descendants[edit]