pour

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See also: poür

English[edit]

Ice Tea poured into a glass

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pouren, pouren ‎(to pour). Origin uncertain. Likely to be of Celtic origin, from Celtic base *purr- ‎(to jerk, throw (water)). Akin to Welsh bwrw ‎(to cast; to strike; to rain), Scottish Gaelic purr ‎(to push, thrust, urge, drive), Irish purraim ‎(I push, I jerk). Compare Flemish pouren ‎(to pour)(rare).

Displaced native Middle English schenchen, schenken ‎(to pour) (from Old English scencan ‎(to pour out)), ȝeoten, yetten ‎(to pour) (from Old English ġēotan ‎(to pour)), temen ‎(to pour out, empty) (from Old Norse tǿma ‎(to pour out, empty)), birlen ‎(to pour, serve drink to) (from Old English byrelian ‎(to pour, serve drink to)), hellen ‎(to pour, pour out) (from Old Norse hella ‎(to pour out, incline)).

Verb[edit]

pour ‎(third-person singular simple present pours, present participle pouring, simple past and past participle poured)

  1. (transitive) To cause to flow in a stream, as a liquid or anything flowing like a liquid, either out of a vessel or into it.
    to pour water from a pail;  to pour wine into a decanter;  to pour oil upon the waters;  to pour out sand or dust.
  2. (transitive) To send forth as in a stream or a flood; to emit; to let escape freely or wholly.
    • The Bible, 1 Samuel i. 15.
      I [] have poured out my soul before the Lord.
    • The Bible, Ezekiel vii. 8
      Now will I shortly pour out my fury upon thee.
    • William Shakespeare
      London doth pour out her citizens!
    • John Milton
      Wherefore did Nature pour her bounties forth With such a full and unwithdrawing hand?
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      At the same time, it is pouring money into cleaning up the country.
  3. (transitive) To send forth from, as in a stream; to discharge uninterruptedly.
    • A. Pope
      Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat?
  4. (intransitive) To flow, pass or issue in or as a stream; to fall continuously and abundantly; as, the rain pours.
    • Gay
      In the rude throng pour on with furious pace.
    • 2011 January 8, Chris Bevan, “Arsenal 1-1 Leeds”, BBC:
      In a breathless finish Arsenal poured forward looking for a winner but Leeds held out for a deserved replay after Bendtner wastefully fired wide and Schmeichel acrobatically kept out Denilson's rasping effort
    The people poured out of the theater.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

pour ‎(plural pours)

  1. The act of pouring.
  2. Something, or an amount, poured.
    • 2003, John Brian Newman, B. S. Choo, Advanced concrete technology: Volume 2
      Over this time period, the first concrete pour has not only lost workability but has started to set so that it is no longer affected by the action of a vibrator.
  3. (colloquial) A stream, or something like a stream; especially a flood of precipitation.
    A pour of rain. --Miss Ferrier.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

pour

  1. Misspelling of pore.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French por, from Latin pro

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

pour

  1. for (when followed by a noun or pronoun)
    J'ai un cadeau pour toi.
    I've got a gift for you.
  2. to (when following a verb at the infinitive)
    Je veux chanter pour te faire revenir.
    I want to sing to make you come back.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French por, from Latin pro.

Preposition[edit]

pour

  1. (Guernsey) for
  2. (Guernsey) in order to

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (peasant, farmer): pur (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter), paur (Vallader)
  • (pawn): pur (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader)

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin, cognate with German Bauer, Dutch boer.

Noun[edit]

pour m (plural pours)

  1. (Surmiran) peasant, farmer
  2. (Surmiran, chess) pawn