foin

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See also: fóin

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French foene (harpoon, fizgig), from Latin fuscina (trident).

Noun[edit]

foin (plural foins)

  1. (archaic) A thrust.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur Book XXI, Chapter iiij, leaf 424r:
      And there kyng Arthur smote syr mordred vnder the shelde wyth a foyne of his spere throughoute the body more than a fadom.
      "And there King Arthur smote Sir Mordred under the shield, with a foin of his spear, throughout the body, more than a fathom."
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax (translator), Jerusalem Delivered, Tasso, XII, lv:
      They move their hands, steadfast their feet remain, / Nor blow nor foin they struck or thrust in vain.

Verb[edit]

foin (third-person singular simple present foins, present participle foining, simple past and past participle foined)

  1. (archaic) To thrust with a sword; to stab at.
  2. (archaic) To prick; to sting.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French fouine (a marten).

Noun[edit]

foin (plural foins)

  1. The beech marten (Martes foina, syn. Mustela foina).
  2. A kind of fur, black at the top on a whitish ground, taken from the ferret or weasel of the same name.
    • 1642, Thomas Fuller, The Holy State, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: [] Roger Daniel for John Williams, [], →OCLC:
      He came to the stake in a fair black gown furred and faced with foins.

Anagrams[edit]

Bavarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German vallen, from Old High German fallan, from Proto-West Germanic *fallan, from Proto-Germanic *fallaną, from Proto-Indo-European *pōl-. Akin to German fallen, Low German fallen, Dutch vallen, English fall, Danish falde, Dutch falla.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔen/
  • Hyphenation: foin

Verb[edit]

foin (past participle gfoin)

  1. (intransitive) to fall; to drop
  2. (intransitive, military) to die; to fall in battle; to die in battle; to be killed in action
  3. (intransitive) to become lower, to decrease, to decline

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle French foin, from Old French fein, from Latin fēnum, monophthongized variant of Latin faenum (hay), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)-no-, from *dʰeh₁(y)-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

foin m (plural foins)

  1. hay

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier fein, from Latin faenum.

Noun[edit]

foin oblique singularm (oblique plural foinz, nominative singular foinz, nominative plural foin)

  1. hay

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • French: foin
  • Norman: fain