foin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: fóin

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French foene (harpoon, fizgig), from Latin fuscina (trident).

Noun[edit]

foin (plural foins)

  1. (archaic) A thrust.

Verb[edit]

foin (third-person singular simple present foins, present participle foining, simple past and past participle foined)

  1. (archaic) To thrust with a sword; to stab at.
  2. (archaic) To prick; to sting.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French fouine (a marten).

Noun[edit]

foin (plural foins)

  1. The beech marten (Martes foina, syn. Mustela foina).
  2. A kind of fur, black at the top on a whitish ground, taken from the ferret or weasel of the same name.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French foin, from Old French fein, from Latin fēnum, monophthongized variant of Latin faenum (hay), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)-no-, from *dʰeh₁(y)-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

foin m (plural foins)

  1. hay

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier fein, from Latin faenum.

Noun[edit]

foin m (oblique plural foinz, nominative singular foinz, nominative plural foin)

  1. hay

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • French: foin
  • Norman: fain