ging

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See also: Ging

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gyng, gynge, genge, from Old English genge (a troop, privy, company, retinue), from Proto-Germanic *gangiją (pace, walk). Cognate with Middle Low German gink (a going, turn, way), Old Norse gengi (accompaniment, entourage, help), Icelandic gengi (rate). Related to Old English gengan (to go), from Proto-Germanic *gangijaną (to go). More at gang.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɪŋ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Noun[edit]

ging (plural gings)

  1. (obsolete) A company; troop; a gang.
  2. (dated) A slingshot

Etymology 2[edit]

From ginger

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ging (plural gings)

  1. (informal) A redhead, a ginger-haired person

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ging

  1. singular past indicative of gaan

Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ging

  1. nose, snot, mucus

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[1], Bangladesh: University of Michigan
  • Mason, M.C. (1904) , English-Garo Dictionary, Mittal Publications, New Delhi, India
  • Garo-Hindi-English Learners' Dictionary, North-Eastern Hill University Publications, Shillong

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ging

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of gehen

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ging f (genitive singular ginge, nominative plural gingeacha)

  1. Ulster form of ding (wedge)

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ging

  1. Alternative form of yong