marc

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See also: marc', març, Març, Marc, and márc.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French marc, from Old French marcher (to trample).

Noun[edit]

marc (usually uncountable, plural marcs)

  1. The refuse matter that remains after fruit, particularly grapes, has been pressed.
  2. An alcoholic spirit distilled from the marc of grapes.
    • 1929, Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms, Folio Society, published 2008, page 298:
      There were a few men in the café sitting with coffee and glasses of kirsch or marc on the tables.
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber, published 1992, page 60:
      The fire was restoked and the army of wine-bottles gave way to a smaller phalanx of brandies, Armagnacs and Marcs, to offset the large bowls of coffee from which rose plumes of fragrance.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc (plural marcs)

  1. (historical, uncommon) Alternative form of mark: various half-pound units of mass, various European currencies.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *marką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc m (plural marcs)

  1. frame
  2. (figurative) framework, setting
    Us aconsellarem per obtenir el resultat més favorable en el marc de la legalitat vigent.
    We will advise you so as to obtain the most favourable result in the existing legal framework.
  3. (historical) marco, Spanish mark, a traditional unit of mass equivalent to about 230 g
  4. (historical) mark, any of various other half-pound units of mass
  5. (historical) mark, a former German currency

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Deverbal of marcher (to trample, walk over)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc m (plural marcs)

  1. pomace, marc
  2. grounds (e.g. from coffee)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish marc, from Proto-Celtic *markos (horse). Cognate with Welsh march, Breton marc’h, and Old English mearh (horse).

Noun[edit]

marc m (genitive singular mairc, nominative plural mairc)

  1. (archaic) horse
    Synonyms: capall, each, (literary) peall
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English mark, from Old English mearc (marker, boundary).

Noun[edit]

marc m (genitive singular mairc, nominative plural marcanna)

  1. target, goal
  2. mark (stroke, tick, marking)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin marca. Doublet of marg.

Noun[edit]

marc m (genitive singular mairc, nominative plural mairc)

  1. (money) mark; shilling
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
marc mharc not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 184, page 92

Kashubian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc

  1. March

Further reading[edit]

  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “marzec”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[1]

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *marką (mark, stamp), possibly via Old Norse mark, mǫrk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc n (nominative plural marc)

  1. mark (as currency etc.)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: mark
  • Irish: marg

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin marcus, itself borrowed from Frankish *mark, from Proto-Germanic *marką (mark, sign, stamp), from Proto-Indo-European *marǵ- (edge, border).

Noun[edit]

marc oblique singularm (oblique plural mars, nominative singular mars, nominative plural marc)

  1. mark (small distinguishing feature)
  2. mark (unit of currency)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *markos (horse). Cognate with Welsh march, Breton marc’h, and beyond Celtic with Old English mearh (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc m (genitive mairc, nominative plural mairc)

  1. horse
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 851
      marc .i. each
      horse, that is, "horse"

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative marc marcL maircL
Vocative mairc marcL marcuH
Accusative marcN marcL marcuH
Genitive maircL marc marcN
Dative marcL marcaib marcaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
marc
also mmarc after a proclitic
marc
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French marc.

Noun[edit]

marc n (uncountable)

  1. pomace, marc

Declension[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish marc, from Proto-Celtic *markos (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc m (genitive singular mairc, plural marcan)

  1. (literary) horse
    Synonym: each
  2. steed

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
marc mharc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marc

  1. Nasal mutation of barc.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
barc farc marc unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.