barefoot

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See also: Barefoot

English[edit]

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 barefoot on Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English barefote, barfot, from Old English bærfōt (barefoot), from Proto-Germanic *bazafōts (barefoot) equivalent to bare +‎ foot. Cognate with Scots barefit (barefoot), Old Frisian berfōt ("barefoot"; modern Saterland Frisian boarfouts (barefoot, adverb)), Dutch barrevoets (barefoot, adverb), German barfuß (barefoot), Danish barfodet (barefoot), Swedish barfota (barefoot, adverb), Icelandic berfættur (barefoot), Yiddish באָרוועס(borves, barefoot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

barefoot (not comparable)

barefoot (1)
  1. Wearing nothing on the feet.
    After taking off their shoes, socks and sandals at the doorway, the kids were barefoot.
    • 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II Scene 2
      CALIBAN:
      [...]
      His spirits hear me,
      And yet I needs must curse. But they'll nor pinch
      Fright me with urchin-shows, pitch me i'th' mire,
      Nor lead me like a firebrand in the dark
      Out of my way, unless he bid 'em; but
      For every trifle are they set upon me,
      Sometimes like apes that now and chatter at me,
      And after bite me; then like hedgehogs, which
      Lie tumbling in my barefoot way, and mount
      Their pricks at my footfall; sometimes am I
      All wound with adders, who with their cloven tongues
      Do hiss me into madness—
      [...]
  2. (colloquial, of a vehicle on an icy road) not using snow chains.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

barefoot (not comparable)

  1. Wearing nothing on the feet.
    She likes to go barefoot in the summertime.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]