poo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: -poo, Poo, POO, and poˀo

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /puː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pu/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uː

Etymology 1

See pooh.

Noun

poo (countable and uncountable, plural poos)

  1. Alternative spelling of pooh: an instance of saying "poo".
  2. (uncountable, childish) Feces.
    • 1960, Harold Wentworth & al., Dictionary of American Slang, p. 401:
      Poo... feces.
    • 2018 Brent Butt, "Sasquatch Your Language", Corner Gas Animated:
      Wherever legitimate tracks are found there's always some fresh scat, y'know, poo, flop, dumplings.
  3. (countable, chiefly UK, childish) A piece of feces or an act of defecation.
    • June 22 1981, The Guardian, p. 8:
      That doggy's doing a poo.
  4. (uncountable, slang) Cannabis resin.
  5. (uncountable, slang) Champagne.
    Who wants another glass of poo?
Synonyms
Coordinate terms
Translations

Verb

poo (third-person singular simple present poos, present participle pooing, simple past and past participle pooed)

  1. Alternative spelling of pooh: to say "poo".
  2. (intransitive, childish) To defecate.
    • 1975 July 6, C. James, Observer, p. 23:
      The dog practically has to poo on his shoe before he can make the pinch.
  3. (transitive, childish) To dirty something with feces.
    • 1989 Dec. 11, The Mercury:
      Most babies I knew then had on introduction either howled or pooed their pants.
    • 2003 March 13, The Sun:
      We all know what happened to them—they... poohed their pants.
Coordinate terms
Synonyms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection

poo

  1. Alternative spelling of pooh: Expressing dismissal, disgust, etc.
  2. (euphemistic) Expressing annoyance, frustration, etc.: a minced oath for 'shit'.
    • 1986 January 12, Chicago Tribune, page 3c:
      Petulant and pouty, Stephanie herself says things like, ‘Oh, poo.’
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Clipping of shampoo.

Noun

poo (uncountable)

  1. Short for shampoo.
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From poodle.

Noun

poo (plural poos)

  1. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2005, Sandra Choron; Harry Choron, Planet Dog: A Doglopedia, Houghton Mifflin Company, →ISBN, page 211:
      To date, the only Poos who have received any serious attention from the AKC are the Labradoodle (Labrador Retriever and Poodle) and the Cockapoo (Cocker Spaniel and Poodle).
    • 2005, Margaret H. Bonham, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Designer Dogs, Alpha Books, →ISBN, page 88:
      There’s no club for Maltipoo breeders yet, so your best bet is to look for a breeder of other Poo dogs.
    • 2007, Renee Riva, Saving Sailor, David C. Cook, page 64:
      My sister has always wanted a little peekapoo, probably because they are kind of prissy, like she is. Personally, I never much cared for poo dogs of any kind, especially poodles. White french poodles are the worst.
    • 2013, Danielle Steel, Pure Joy, Transworld Publishers, →ISBN:
      And I looked at what I call the “poo” dogs, the currently fashionable/popular combos of cockapoo, yor-kiepoo, maltipoo, and a whole bunch of other “poos” that seemed unpredictable to me as to how big they would be, and what traits they would have of either breed.
    • 2014, Sheila Agnew, Evie Brooks in Central Park Showdown, Dublin: The O’Brien Press, →ISBN, page 87:
      ‘What kind of dog is Eddie?’ I asked curiously. ‘He’s a Westiepoo.’ ‘A what?’ ‘Westiepoo,’ repeated Nikki, ‘a West Highland White Terrier/Poodle mix. I’m pretty much obsessed with poos.’ ‘We have plenty of that round here,’ I said, ‘so you’ve come to the right place.’ ‘You might have worded that better, Nikki,’ said Max and she laughed. ‘I’m obsessed with poodle hybrids,’ Nikki explained.
    • 2017, Teresa Toten, Beware That Girl, Hot Key Books, Bonnier Zaffre Ltd, →ISBN:
      She kept the bookmarks firmly on the “poo” dogs. “Come on! Just look. They’re irresistible!” She kept scrolling through sites for Maltipoos, Shih-poos and Yorkipoos.
    • 2019, Miranda Liasson, All I Want for Christmas Is You, Forever, Hachette Book Group, →ISBN:
      Then this family came in who wanted one of those fancy poo dogs and the woman wanted to dress it up and carry it around in her purse and I...I just...

Anagrams


'Are'are

Noun

poo

  1. pig

References


Coastal Kadazan

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *paqa.

Noun

poo

  1. thigh

Esperanto

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology

Derived from translingual Poa, from Ancient Greek πόα (póa, fodder).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpoo]
  • Rhymes: -oo
  • Hyphenation: po‧o

Noun

poo (accusative singular poon, plural pooj, accusative plural poojn)

  1. Poa

Derived terms


Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian poco and French peu, from Latin paucus.

Adverb

poo

  1. little, few

Middle English

Noun

poo

  1. Alternative form of po

Old Portuguese

Etymology

From a Vulgar Latin *pulus, from earlier *pulvus n, from Latin pulvis m, from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (flour, dust).

Pronunciation

Noun

poo m (plural poos)

  1. powder (fine particles made by grinding substance)

Descendants

  • Galician: po
  • Portuguese:
    • Guinea-Bissau Creole: po

Seri

PecariTajacu.jpg

Noun

poo

  1. (archaic) collared peccary, Pecari tajacu
    Synonym: ziix ina quicös

Derived terms


Tswana

Pronunciation

Noun

pôô (plural dipoo)

  1. bull (male cow)

West Makian

Pronunciation

Noun

poo

  1. seed, pit

References

  • James Collins (1982) Further Notes Towards a West Makian Vocabulary[1], Pacific linguistics

Wolio

Etymology

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *pahuq.

Noun

poo

  1. mango

References

  • Anceaux, Johannes C. (1987) Wolio Dictionary (Wolio-English-Indonesian) / Kamus Bahasa Wolio (Wolio-Inggeris-Indonesia), Dordrecht: Foris

Yoruba

Etymology

From English po.

Pronunciation

Noun

póò

  1. A bucket serving as a traditional toilet, chamber pot