cagar

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See also: čagar

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin cacāre, present active infinitive of cacō, from a Proto-Indo-European *kakka-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cagar (first-person singular present cago, past participle cagat)

  1. (vulgar) to shit

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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Further reading[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin cacāre, present active infinitive of cacō.

Verb[edit]

cagar

  1. (vulgar) to shit

Conjugation[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cagar, from Latin cacāre, present active infinitive of cacō, from a Proto-Indo-European *kakka-.

Verb[edit]

cagar (first-person singular present indicative cago, past participle cagado)

  1. (vulgar, intransitive, transitive) to shit; to defecate
  2. (vulgar, slang, figuratively, intransitive) to get lucky
    Synonyms: ter sorte, tirar a sorte grande
  3. (vulgar, slang, figuratively, takes a reflexive pronoun) to shit oneself (to be very scared)
  4. (Brazil, vulgar, slang, figuratively, with para) not to give a fuck (to really not care)
  5. (vulgar, slang, intransitive, or transitive with em) to fuck up; to botch; to screw up (to do something incorrectly)

Conjugation[edit]

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Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cocur, cocar (consultation, (secret) discussion, confabulation; act of consulting, conferring, planning), from com + cor.

Noun[edit]

cagar m (genitive singular cagair, plural cagairean)

  1. verbal noun of cagair
  2. whisper
  3. secret
    Synonym: rùn
  4. dear, darling
    Trobhad, a cagair.Come, dear.

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cagar chagar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • cocur” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish cagar, from Latin cacāre, present active infinitive of cacō, ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European root *kakka-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kaˈɡaɾ/, [kaˈɣaɾ]

Verb[edit]

cagar (first-person singular present cago, first-person singular preterite cagué, past participle cagado)

  1. (vulgar) to shit
  2. (vulgar) to tell someone off, exclamation of rejection
    ¡Anda a cagar!(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    ¡Vete a cagar!(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. (colloquial) to bust
  4. (colloquial) to get busted
  5. (intransitive, Chile, colloquial) to fail
  6. (transitive, Chile) to cheat someone
  7. (transitive, Spain, colloquial) to make a mistake
    ¡No la cagues!(please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Synonym: equivocarse

Conjugation[edit]

  • Rule: g becomes a gu before e.

Synonyms[edit]

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