bust

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See also: büst

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English busten, a variant of Middle English bursten, bresten (to burst). Compare German Low German basten and barsten (to burst). More at burst.

Verb[edit]

bust (third-person singular simple present busts, present participle busting, simple past and past participle busted or bust)

  1. (transitive, colloquial, chiefly US) To break.
    {{ux|en|I busted my cooker while trying to fix it.
  2. (transitive, slang) To arrest (someone) for a crime.
  3. (transitive, slang) To catch (someone) in the act of doing something wrong, socially and morally inappropriate, or illegal, especially when being done in a sneaky or secretive state.
  4. (snowboarding) An emphatic synonym of do or get.
    He busted huge air off that jump!
  5. (US, informal) To reduce in rank.
    He busted him down to patrolman for insubordination.
    • 1962, The Manchurian Candidate, 01:56:35
      If Steinkamp doesn't take off that hat and stop messing around, I'm gonna bust him into a PFC.
  6. (finance, transitive) To undo a trade, generally an error trade, that has already been executed.
  7. (poker) To lose all of one's chips.
  8. (blackjack) To exceed a score of 21.
  9. (transitive, slang) To break in (an animal).
    • 1997, Charles Oswald, Gone with the Western Wind:
      A few weeks later, Richard was killed accidentally while busting a wild mustang []
  10. (intransitive, slang) To ejaculate; to eject semen.
  11. (journalism, intransitive) For a headline to exceed the amount of space reserved for it.
    • 1990, Paul Williams, The Computerized Newspaper: A Practical Guide for Systems Users (page 105)
      The temptation to squeeze in a favourite headline that busts by using the flexibility of new technology is often very strong.
    • 2007, Rob Steen, Sports Journalism: A Multimedia Primer (page 167)
      If your headline busts (breaks the confines of the layout) you will know straightaway. Similarly, the computer will inform you, in terms of the number of lines, how much longer or shorter the copy is in relation to the space allotted.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (to arrest for a crime): nick
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

bust (plural busts)

  1. (slang) The act of arresting someone for a crime, or raiding a suspected criminal operation.
    a narcotics bust
  2. (slang) A police raid or takedown of a criminal enterprise.
  3. (slang) A failed enterprise; a bomb.
  4. (chess, informal) A refutation of an opening, or of a previously published analysis.
  5. (slang) A disappointment.
  6. (sports, derogatory) A player who fails to meet expectations.
  7. (economics) The downward portion of a boom and bust cycle; a recession.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bust (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Without any money, broke, bankrupt.
    After months of financial problems, the company finally went bust.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Bust of Marie Antoinette
The Bust of Pericles with the Corinthian Helmet, Roman after a Greek original, from circa 430 BC, made of marble

Borrowed from French buste, from Italian busto (torso, upper body), from Latin bustum (funeral monument, tomb," originally "funeral pyre, place where corpses are burned). Perhaps shortened from Latin ambustum, neuter of ambustus (scorched), past participle of ambūrō (burn all over, scorch), from ambi- (around) + ūrō (to burn).

Alternatively, perhaps from Old Latin borō, the early form of classical Latin ūrō (to burn).

Noun[edit]

bust (plural busts)

  1. A sculptural portrayal of a person's head and shoulders.
  2. The breasts and upper thorax of a woman.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin būstum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bust m (plural busts or bustos)

  1. bust (sculpture)
  2. bust (breasts and upper thorax)

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bust

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of bussen

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French buste.

Noun[edit]

bust n (plural busturi)

  1. bust (sculpture)

Declension[edit]