pit

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See also: PIT, pít, pît, and pīt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

A close-up of a pit.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pit, pet, püt, from Old English pytt, from Proto-West Germanic *puti, from Latin puteus (trench, pit, well), although there are phonetic difficulties.

Noun[edit]

pit (plural pits)

  1. A hole in the ground.
    The meadow around the town is full of old pits.
  2. (motor racing) An area at a racetrack used for refueling and repairing the vehicles during a race.
    Two drivers have already gone into the pit this early in the race.
  3. (music) A section of the marching band containing mallet percussion instruments and other large percussion instruments too large to march, such as the tam tam. Also, the area on the sidelines where these instruments are placed.
  4. A mine.
  5. (archaeology) A hole or trench in the ground, excavated according to grid coordinates, so that the provenance of any feature observed and any specimen or artifact revealed may be established by precise measurement.
  6. (trading) A trading pit.
  7. The bottom part of something.
    I felt pain in the pit of my stomach.
  8. (colloquial) Armpit.
  9. (aviation) A luggage hold.
  10. (countable) A small surface hole or depression, a fossa.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria, […].
  11. The indented mark left by a pustule, as in smallpox.
  12. The grave, underworld or Hell.
  13. An enclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.
  14. Formerly, that part of a theatre, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theatre.
  15. (gambling) Part of a casino which typically holds tables for blackjack, craps, roulette, and other games.
  16. (slang) A pit bull terrier.
    I'm taking one of my pits to the vet on Thursday.
  17. (in the plural, with the, slang) Only used in the pits.
    His circus job was the pits, but at least he was in show business.
  18. (slang) A mosh pit.
    Because the museum was closed for renovation, the school decided to bring its fourth-graders to the pit at a Cannibal Corpse gig instead.
  19. (law enforcement, usually used with "maneuver") A maneuver by which a police officer, by use of a police car, nudges the vehicle of a fleeing suspect enough for the suspect's vehicle to lose control and become disabled so the police officer can catch and apprehend the suspect.
  20. (hospital slang) The emergency department.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pitting, simple past and past participle pitted)

  1. (transitive) To make pits in; to mark with little hollows.
    Exposure to acid rain pitted the metal.
  2. (transitive) To put (an animal) into a pit for fighting.
  3. (transitive) To bring (something) into opposition with something else.
    Are you ready to pit your wits against one of the world's greatest puzzles?
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[1]
      For the 75 years since a district rebellion was put down, The Games have existed as an assertion of the Capital’s power, a winner-take-all contest that touts heroism and sacrifice—participants are called “tributes”— while pitting the districts against each other.
    • 2017 August 25, Aukkarapon Niyomyat & Panarat Thepgumpanat, "Thai junta seeks Yingluck's arrest as former PM skips court verdict", in reuters.com, Reuters
      That movement, pitted against a Bangkok-centered royalist and pro-military elite, has been at the heart of years of turmoil.
    • 2017 August 25, "Arrest threat as Yingluck Shinawatra misses verdict", in aljazeera.com, Al Jazeera
      Thaksin's ouster triggered years of upheaval and division that has pitted a poor, rural majority in the north that supports the Shinawatras against royalists, the military and their urban backers.
  4. (intransitive, motor racing) To return to the pits during a race for refuelling, tyre changes, repairs etc.
    • 2020 September 13, Andrew Benson, “Tuscan Grand Prix: Lewis Hamilton claims 90th win after incredible race”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Bottas had to pit earlier than expected for fresh tyres. Hamilton followed him in next time around and the two drivers were instructed to stay off the kerbs to protect their tyres.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch pit (kernel, core), from Middle Dutch pitte, from Proto-Germanic *pittan (compare dialectal German Pfitze (pimple)), oblique of Proto-Germanic *piþō. Compare pith.

Noun[edit]

pit (plural pits)

  1. A seed inside a fruit; a stone or pip inside a fruit.
  2. A shell in a drupe containing a seed.
  3. (military) The core of an implosion nuclear weapon, consisting of the fissile material and any neutron reflector or tamper bonded to it.
    • 1996, “2 Background”, in w:National Research Council (United States), editor, An Evaluation of the Electrometallurgical Approach for Treatment of Excess Weapons Plutonium (in English), Washington DC, USA: National Academies Press, DOI:10.17226/9187, page 15:
      [...] weapons "pits" (the plutonium components of nuclear weapons, named by analogy with the pit of a fruit such as a peach), [...].
    • 1999, Fitzpatrick, Anne C, Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952[3] (in English), Los Alamos, NM (United States): Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), DOI:10.2172/10596, Thesis LA-13577-T, page 248:
      The Nagasaki-type [bomb] [...] had a wider range of yield potential depending on the kind of fissile core and tamper assembly, or "pit," used in it.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pitting, simple past and past participle pitted)

  1. (transitive) To remove the stone from a stone fruit or the shell from a drupe.
    One must pit a peach to make it ready for a pie.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening.

Noun[edit]

pit (plural pits)

  1. (informal) A pit bull terrier.
    • 2012, Shorty Rossi, Four Feet Tall and Rising, page 186:
      I resolved to find all my pits good homes and to get out of the rescue and breeding business.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cahuilla[edit]

Noun[edit]

pít

  1. road, path, way

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin pectus, from Proto-Italic *pektos, from Proto-Indo-European *peg- (breast). Compare Italian petto, Portuguese peito, Romanian piept, Spanish pecho.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pit m (plural pits)

  1. breast
    Synonym: mamella
  2. (castells) force to support the castell, provided by the castellers in the pinya by pressing their chest onto the back of the casteller in front of them

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit

  1. masculine singular passive participle of pít

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch pit. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

pit m or f (plural pitten, diminutive pitje n)

  1. A seed inside a fruit.
  2. wick (of a candle, lamp or other implement)
    Synonyms: lemmet, lont, wiek
  3. burner (on a stove)
  4. spirit, vigour
    Hij heeft pit.He has something going for him.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English pit.

Noun[edit]

pit m (plural pits)

  1. (racing) pit (refueling station and garage at a race track)
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish pit (pit, hollow; female pudenda), possibly related to putte (pit, hollow), Latin puteus.

Noun[edit]

pit f (genitive singular pite, nominative plural piteanna)

  1. (anatomy) vulva
  2. shell-less crab

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pit phit bpit
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch fiets (bicycle)

Noun[edit]

pit

  1. bicycle

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit

  1. supine of piś

Min Nan[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of pit – see (“writing brush; pen; pencil; etc.”).
(This character, pit, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pit f

  1. genitive plural of pita

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pittin, simple past pit, past participle pit)

  1. to put

Synonyms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish pit (pit, hollow; female pudenda), possibly related to putte (pit, hollow), Latin puteus.

Noun[edit]

pit f (genitive singular pite, plural pitean)

  1. female external genitalia, vulva
  2. (vulgar) cunt, pussy

References[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “pit”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “pit, (put)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Tocharian B[edit]

Noun[edit]

pit

  1. gall, bile

West Flemish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch pit, variant of put, from Old Dutch *putti, from Proto-West Germanic *puti, from Latin puteus.

Noun[edit]

pit m

  1. pit
  2. well

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit

  1. squeak, beep

Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

pit

  1. Alternative form of pidh