putt

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: put, Putt, and Pütt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Scots putt (to put).[1] Compare Middle Dutch putten (to dig a hit). The Old English putian (to push; thrust; put; place) derivation is commonly assumed, although no longer valid. In Dutch, the word is instanced in a description of golf in an early seventeenth-century edition of Pieter van Afferden's Tyrocinium linguae latinae.[2] All derive from Proto-Germanic *putōną.

Noun[edit]

putt (plural putts)

  1. (golf) The act of tapping a golf ball lightly on a putting green.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

putt (third-person singular simple present putts, present participle putting, simple past and past participle putted)

  1. (golf) To lightly strike a golf ball with a putter.
    • 1913, Arthur Conan Doyle, “(please specify the page)”, in The Poison Belt [], London; New York, N.Y.: Hodder and Stoughton, →OCLC:
      There were the golfers. Was it possible that they were going on with their game? Yes, there was a fellow driving off from a tee, and that other group upon the green were surely putting for the hole.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic, from putt-putt.

Noun[edit]

putt (plural putts)

  1. (onomatopoeia) A regular sound characterized by the sound of "putt putt putt putt...", such as made by some slowly stroking internal combustion engines.
  2. (Britain, motorcycling, slang) A motorcycle.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

putt (third-person singular simple present putts, present participle putting, simple past and past participle putted)

  1. To make a putting sound.
  2. (motorcycling, slang) To ride one's motorcycle, to go for a motorcycle ride.
  3. To move along slowly.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

putt (third-person singular simple present putts, present participle putting, simple past and past participle putt)

  1. Obsolete form of put.
    • c. 1691, John Aubrey, Naturall Historie of Wiltshire:
      We have a custome, that when one sneezes, every one els putts off his hatt, and bowes, and cries God bless ye Sir.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  2. ^ Heiner Gillmeister, “Über den Ursprung des Golfspiels”, March 7, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

putt

  1. imperative of putte

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English putten.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

putt (third-person singular simple present putts, present participle puttin, simple past putt, past participle putt)

  1. to put

Usage notes[edit]

  • Note the pronunciation.

Synonyms[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of imitative origin (also compare English pout).

Adjective[edit]

putt

  1. sour and disappointed; sulky

Declension[edit]

Inflection of putt
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular putt
Neuter singular putt
Plural putta
Masculine plural3 putte
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 putte
All putta
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Noun[edit]

putt c

  1. (golf) a putt
  2. a light push or shove (more generally)

Declension[edit]

Declension of putt 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative putt putten puttar puttarna
Genitive putts puttens puttars puttarnas

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]