pant

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Pant and pant-

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: pănt, IPA(key): /pænt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English panten, whence also English dialectal pank.

Possibly from Old French pantoyer, a byform or of Old French pantoisier (to be breathless) (compare modern French panteler (to gasp for breath)), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Vulgar Latin *pantasiō (struggling for breath when having a nightmare), from Ancient Greek φαντασιόω (phantasióō, I am subject to hallucinations), from φαντασία (phantasía, appearance, image, fantasy).

Noun[edit]

pant (plural pants)

  1. A quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp.
  2. (figuratively) Eager longing.
    • 1995, John C. Leggett, ‎Suzanne Malm, The Eighteen Stages of Love (page 9)
      Indeed, the projections, cravings, and everyday frolics common to trysts among buzz-activist Hollywood stars and starlets, plus their many common folk imitators, go forward with eager pant.
  3. (obsolete) A violent palpitation of the heart.
Translations[edit]
References[edit]

Verb[edit]

pant (third-person singular simple present pants, present participle panting, simple past and past participle panted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Pluto pants for breath from out his cell.
    • (Can we date this quote by Shelley and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      There is a cavern where my spirit / Was panted forth in anguish.
    • 1749, [John Cleland], “(Please specify the letter or volume)”, in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure [Fanny Hill], London: Printed [by Thomas Parker] for G. Fenton [i.e., Fenton and Ralph Griffiths] [], OCLC 731622352:
      Charles had just slipp'd the bolt of the door, and running, caught me in his arms, and lifting me from the ground, with his lips glew'd to mine, bore me, trembling, panting, dying, with soft fears and tender wishes, to the bed
  2. (intransitive) To long eagerly; to desire earnestly.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To long for (something); to be eager for (something).
    • (Can we date this quote by Herbert and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Then shall our hearts pant thee.
  4. (intransitive) Of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  5. (intransitive) To sigh; to flutter; to languish.
    • 1709, Alexander Pope, Pastorals, Winter:
      The whispering breeze / Pants on the leaves, and dies upon the trees.
  6. (intransitive) To heave, as the breast.
  7. (intransitive) To bulge and shrink successively, of iron hulls, etc.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From pants

Noun[edit]

pant (plural pants)

  1. (fashion) A pair of pants (trousers or underpants).
  2. (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to pants.
    Pant leg
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Unknown

Noun[edit]

pant (plural pants)

  1. (Scotland and northeast England) Any public drinking fountain.

References[edit]

  • OED 2nd edition

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

pant m

  1. hinge

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pant

  1. a deposit (on packaging such as bottles and cans)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

pant

  1. Alternative form of panten

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun[edit]

pant n (definite singular pantet, indefinite plural pant, definite plural panta or pantene)

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)
  2. a mortgage
  3. security (on a loan)
  4. a forfeit (in a game)
  5. a pledge

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pant m (definite singular panten, indefinite plural panter, definite plural pantene)

  1. a (refundable) deposit (e.g. on bottles)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun[edit]

pant n (definite singular pantet, indefinite plural pant, definite plural panta)

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)
  2. a mortgage
  3. security (on a loan)
  4. a forfeit (in a game)
  5. a pledge

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pant m (definite singular panten, indefinite plural pantar, definite plural pantane)

  1. a (refundable) deposit (e.g. on bottles)

References[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Band via Austrian German.

Noun[edit]

pȁnt m (Cyrillic spelling па̏нт)

  1. hinge

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun[edit]

pant n

  1. pledge, item deposited at a pawnshop or otherwise given as a security; money returned when a bottle or similar is recycled

Declension[edit]

Declension of pant 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pant panten panter panterna
Genitive pants pantens panters panternas

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *kwantyo- "flat hill".

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pant m (plural pantiau)

  1. hollow, depression, small valley, dingle, dell

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pant bant mhant phant
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.