crave

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English craven, from Old English crafian (to crave, ask, implore, demand, summon), from Proto-Germanic *krafjaną (to demand). Cognate with Danish kræve (to demand, require), Swedish kräva (to crave, demand), Icelandic krefja (to demand).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: krāv, IPA(key): /kɹeɪv/
  • Rhymes: -eɪv
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

crave (third-person singular simple present craves, present participle craving, simple past and past participle craved)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To desire strongly, so as to satisfy an appetite; to long or yearn for.
    to crave for peace
    to crave after wealth
    to crave drugs
  2. (transitive) To ask for earnestly; to beg; to claim.
    I humbly crave your indulgence to read this letter until the end.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To call for; to require as a course of action.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

crave (plural craves)

  1. (law, Scotland) A formal application to a court to make a particular order.

References[edit]

  • Kroonen, Guus, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2013, →ISBN, s. v. “*krabēn-” and “*krēbi-”.

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

crave

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cravar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of cravar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cravar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cravar

Sardinian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier *clave, from Latin clāvis, clāvem, from Proto-Italic *klāwis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

crave f (plural craves)

  1. key