craven

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See also: Craven

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English cravant, either borrowed from Old French cravanté (defeated), past participle of cravanter, or a modification of creaunt (defeated) after craven (to crave).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɹeɪ.vən/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪvən

Adjective[edit]

craven (comparative more craven, superlative most craven)

  1. Unwilling to fight; lacking even the rudiments of courage; extremely cowardly.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:cowardly
    • 1808 February 22, Walter Scott, “(please specify the introduction or canto number, or chapter name)”, in Marmion; a Tale of Flodden Field, Edinburgh: [] J[ames] Ballantyne and Co. for Archibald Constable and Company, []; London: William Miller, and John Murray, OCLC 270129616:
      The poor craven bridegroom said never a word.
    • 2010, Bruce Cumings, The Korean War:
      Prime Minister Abe's fumbling and craven performance took place on a national holiday in Korea, marking the country wide uprising against the Japanese colonial rule that began on March 1, 1919. March 1 is also the day in 1932 that Japan chose to inaugurate Manchukuo (after seizing northeastern China).
    • 2020 October 12, Andrew Marantz, “Why Facebook Can’t Fix Itself”, in The New Yorker[1]:
      “But they’ve made some big carve-outs that are just absolute nonsense. There’s no perfect approach to content moderation, but they could at least try to look less transparently craven and incoherent.”

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

craven (plural cravens)

  1. A coward.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:coward

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

craven (third-person singular simple present cravens, present participle cravening, simple past and past participle cravened)

  1. To make craven.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Jamaican Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English craving.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /krʲeːvən/, /krʲeːbən/
  • Hyphenation: cra‧ven

Adjective[edit]

craven

  1. gluttonous, greedy
    • 2002, Frederic Gomes Cassidy, Robert Brock Le Page, Dictionary of Jamaican English[2] (in English), →ISBN, page 128:
      “Anancy .. walk home wid Puss an sey 'tap Bra Puss is how you dah play so nice wid Rat an noh eat him yet? Yuh no know sey Rat is nice meat?' Hear puss wid him craven self, 'true Bra Nancy?' []
      Anancy was walking back home with Cat and said "Wait a minute, Br'er Cat. How come you were playing so nice with Rat? Why didn't you eat him? Don't you know that Rat tastes great?' That greedy cat replied, 'Is that so, Br'er Anancy?' []
    Synonyms: gravalicious, licky-licky, nyamy-nyamy
    Da bwoy deh too damn craven. 'Im nuh come nyam off all a di food inna mi pot.
    That boy's bloody greedy. Can you believe he ate all the food in my pot?

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Allsopp, editor, Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies Press, 1996 (2003 printing), →ISBN, page 175

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English crafian, from Proto-West Germanic *krafōn, modification of Proto-Germanic *krafjaną (to demand).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

craven

  1. To ask or petition (for something)
  2. To demand or claim; to ask forcefully.
  3. To ask or inquire (about something)
  4. (rare) To want or crave.
  5. (rare) To charge; to calumniate.
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: crave
  • Scots: crave
  • Yola: crave
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French cravanté (defeated), past participle of cravanter, from Latin crepare (to crack", "creak)

Adjective[edit]

craven

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Alternative form of cravant (defeated)