craven

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English craven (adjective)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

craven (comparative more craven, superlative most craven)

  1. Unwilling to fight; lacking even the rudiments of courage; extremely cowardly.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      The poor craven bridegroom said never a word.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

craven (plural cravens)

  1. A coward.
    • Shakespeare
      He is a craven and a villain else.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

craven (third-person singular simple present cravens, present participle cravening, simple past and past participle cravened)

  1. To make craven.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French cravanté (defeated), past participle of cravanter, from Latin crepare (to crack", "creak)

Adjective[edit]

craven

  1. Defeated.

Etymology 2[edit]

Old English crafian, indicating Proto-Germanic *krabōną (compare related Old Norse krefja (to demand) > Danish kræve, Norwegian kreve (to demand)).

Verb[edit]

craven

  1. desire; crave
Derived terms[edit]