poop

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /puːp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain, possibly from Middle English poupen (to make a gulping sound while drinking, blow on a horn, toot). Compare Dutch poepen (to defecate), German Low German pupen (to fart; break wind).

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To make a short blast on a horn [from late 14th c.]
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To break wind. [from 18th c.]
  3. (informal, childish, intransitive) To defecate.
    His horse pooped right in the middle of the parade.
Synonyms
Translations

Noun

poop (countable and uncountable, plural poops)

  1. (informal, often childish) Fecal matter, feces. [from the 18th c.]
    The dog poop is on the grass.
  2. The sound of a steam engine's whistle; typically low pitch.
    • 2001, Rev. W. Awdry, Thomas the tank engine collection : a unique collection of stories from the railway series - p. 157 - Egmont Books, Limited, Aug 15, 2001
      Two minutes passed - five - seven - ten. "Poop! Poop!" Everyone knew that whistle, and a mighty cheer went up as the Queen's train glided into the station.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

poop

  1. (childish, euphemistic) Expressing annoyed disappointment.

Etymology 2

Recorded in World War II (1941) Army slang poop sheet (up-to-date information), itself of uncertain origin, perhaps toilet paper referring to etymology 2.

Noun

poop (uncountable)

  1. A set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process.
    Here’s the info paper with the poop on that carburetor.

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain, perhaps sound imitation.

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (transitive) To tire, exhaust. Often used with out. [from early 20th c.]
    I'm pooped from working so hard.
    He pooped out a few strides from the finish line.
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English poupe, pope, from Old French pope, poupe, pouppe, from Italian poppa, from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin puppis, all meaning “stern of a ship”.

Alternative forms

Noun

poop (countable and uncountable, plural poops)

  1. (nautical) The stern of a ship.
  2. (nautical) The poop deck.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (transitive) To break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck.
    We were pooped within hailing of the quay and were nearly sunk.
    • 1819, Vaux, James Hardy, chapter 18, in Memoirs of James Hardy Vaux, volume 1, page 207:
      Another night, as we were scudding before a heavy gale of wind, and a tremendous sea rolling after us, we had the misfortune to be pooped, as the phrase is, by a wave or sea striking our stern, which stove in the cabin-windows, and rushing impetuously through the cabin, and along the main-deck, bore down all before it.
  2. (transitive) To embark a ship over the stern.

Etymology 5

Origin uncertain, perhaps a shortening of nincompoop.

Noun

poop (plural poops)

  1. A slothful person.
    • 1976, Vonnegut, Kurt, chapter 48, in Slapstick, Delacorte Press, page 224:
      Aside from battles, the history of nations seemed to consist of nothing but powerless old poops like myself, heavily medicated and vaguely beloved in the long ago, coming to kiss the boots of young psychopaths.
Synonyms
Translations

Anagrams