amen

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English amen, from Old English, from Ecclesiastical Latin āmēn, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly) (cognate with Arabic آمِينَ(ʾāmīna), Classical Syriac ܐܡܝܢ(ʾāmên)). In Old English, it was used only at the end of the Gospels. Elsewhere, it was translated as sōþlīċe! (truly”, “indeed!), swā hit is (so it is), and sīe! ([so] be it!).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /eɪˈmɛn/, /ɑːˈmɛn/, /ˈeɪ.mɛn/
    • Both pronunciations are used, sometimes even by the same speaker depending on the context.
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Adverb[edit]

amen (not comparable)

  1. At the end of religious prayers: so be it.
  2. In many Abrahamic religious texts and creeds: truly, verily.
    • 1582, Bible in Rhemish translation, John 3:5:
      Amen, amen, I say to thee, except a man be born again, he can not see the kingdom of God.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. (Discuss(+) this sense) An expression of strong agreement. Often, though dated, in the phrase "Amen to that".
    • 1999 May, Matt Groening, “Hell Is Other Robots”, Futurama, season 1, episode 9
      Fry: Bender's stupid religion is driving me nuts! / Leela: Amen!

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

amen (plural amens)

  1. An instance of saying ‘amen’.
    • 1846 October 1 – 1848 April 1, Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1848, OCLC 145080417:
      The amens of the dusty clerk appear, like Macbeth’s, to stick in his throat a little; but Captain Cuttle helps him out, []
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1965, page 12:
      [H]is `Amens' were ejected at the pulpit with the severity of a reprimand.
    • 2006, Evault Boswell, The Iron Mountain Baby:
      A chorus of amens rang out across the audience.
  2. A title of Christ; the Faithful One (especially with reference to Revelation 3:14)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

amen (third-person singular simple present amens, present participle amening, simple past and past participle amened)

  1. (intransitive) To say amen.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, "Sunday," [1]
      The moment Dr. Reid amened, we rushed straight out of the church off home.
    • 2015, T. M. Young, Much Given, Much Required (page xxx)
      Most of the church amened and applauded.
    • 2015, Jewelle Francis, Manifest Destiny:
      She must be thinking Reverend Hopkins is talking directly to her, because she starts amening and shouting real loud when he gets to the part in Proverbs []
  2. (transitive) To say amen to; to ratify solemnly.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

amen

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of amar

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Spanish amén, from Latin āmēn, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Hebrew אמן(amén, certainly, truly).

The gesture evolved from the custom of kissing the ecclesiastical ring of Catholic clergymen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧men

Adverb[edit]

amen

  1. at the end of religious prayers: so be it

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. an expression of strong agreement

Verb[edit]

amen

  1. to touch one's forehead to the back of an older person's hand as a gesture of respect
  2. to hold out one's hand to someone, often a younger person, in order for them to touch it to their foreheads

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:amen.


Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English amen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aˈmɛn/, /aˈbɛn/

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle Dutch amen, from Latin āmēn, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אמן(amén, certainly, truly).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen; at the end of Judeo-Christian prayers: so be it
  2. amen; an expression of strong agreement

Noun[edit]

amen n (plural amens, diminutive amentje n)

  1. An instance of saying ‘amen’.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Negerhollands: amen
  • ? Sranan Tongo: amen

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Ecclesiastical Latin āmēn, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin amen, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Noun[edit]

amen m (plural amens)

  1. amen

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

amen

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of amar

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin āmēn, from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Hebrew אמן‎.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Derived terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

amēn

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌼𐌴𐌽

Icelandic[edit]

Adverb[edit]

amen

  1. at the end of prayers: so be it
    Í guðanna bænum, amen.
    For God's sake, amen.
  2. at the end of a creeds or in Biblical translations: truly, verily

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. expressing strong agreement

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἀμήν (amḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly) (cognate with Arabic آمِين(ʾāmīn), Classical Syriac ܐܡܝܢ(ʾāmên)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.men/
  • Rhymes: -amen
  • Hyphenation: à‧men

Adverb[edit]

amen

  1. amen; so be it
  2. (colloquial) that's it; end of the story
    L'esame è andato male, pace e amen, fattene una ragione.
    The exam went bad, that's it, come to terms with it.

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Sense 2, similar to pace and va beh, is colloquial, and typically seen in the phrase pace e amen, as in the example.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Koine Greek ᾱ̓μήν (āmḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly); cognate with Arabic آمِين(ʾāmīn), Aramaic אַמִין(ʾamīn), Classical Syriac ܐܰܡܺܝܢ‬(ʾamīn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

āmēn (not comparable) (biblical, Christianity, Late Latin, Medieval Latin, Ecclesiastical Latin)

  1. amen; so be it, let it be
  2. amen; truly, verily

Interjection[edit]

āmēn

  1. amen!

References[edit]

  • amen”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amen in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • amen in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette, page 113
  • amen in Georges, Karl Ernst; Georges (1913–1918) Ausführliches lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch, Hahnsche Buchhandlung, page 375

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin āmēn.

Interjection[edit]

āmen

  1. amen, so be it

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English, from Latin āmēn.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /aːˈmɛːn/, /aːˈmɛn/

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly).

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Noun[edit]

amen n (definite singular amenet, indefinite plural amen or amener, definite plural amena or amenene)

  1. an amen

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn, certainly, truly).

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. amen

Noun[edit]

amen n (definite singular amenet, indefinite plural amen, definite plural amena)

  1. an amen

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin āmēn, from Koine Greek ᾱ̓μήν (āmḗn), from Biblical Hebrew אָמֵן(ʾāmēn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. (religion) amen! (at the end of religious prayers)
  2. (sometimes humorous) amen! (used to end a statement)

Derived terms[edit]

adverb
particle

Further reading[edit]

  • amen in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • amen in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Interjection[edit]

amen

  1. Obsolete spelling of amém

Romani[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀅𑀫𑁆𑀳𑁂 (amhe),[1] from Sanskrit अस्मान् (asmān),[1][2] from Proto-Indo-European *n̥smé.

Pronoun[edit]

amen

  1. we[1][3]
  2. accusative of amen: us

Descendants[edit]

  • Kalo Finnish Romani: ame

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Boretzky, Norbert; Igla, Birgit (1994), “amén”, in Wörterbuch Romani-Deutsch-Englisch für den südosteuropäischen Raum : mit einer Grammatik der Dialektvarianten [Romani-German-English dictionary for the Southern European region] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, →ISBN, page 6a
  2. ^ Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “asmad”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 43
  3. ^ Marcel Courthiade (2009), “amen”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 60a

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

amen

  1. inflection of amar:
    1. third-person plural present subjunctive
    2. third-person plural imperative

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish amén.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧men
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈmen/, [ʔɐˈmen]

Interjection[edit]

amén

  1. amen (at the end of religious prayers: so be it)
    Synonym: siyanawa

Noun[edit]

amén

  1. hand-kissing of one's elders (as a sign of respect)
    Synonyms: mano, pagmano, pagmamano
  2. saying of yes to everything that another says

Derived terms[edit]