agree

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: agrée and agréé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English agreen, from Old French agreer (to accept or receive kindly), from a gré (favorably), from Latin ad (to) + gratum (pleasing).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

agree (third-person singular simple present agrees, present participle agreeing, simple past and past participle agreed)

  1. (intransitive) To harmonize in opinion, statement, or action; to be in unison or concord; to be or become united or consistent; to concur.
    all parties agree in the expediency of the law.
    • 1594, Thomas Lodge, The wounds of civil war: Lively set forth in the true tragedies of Marius and Scilla, page 46:
      You know that in so great a state as this, Two mightie foes can never well agree.
    • 2018, Jon Stone, “Brexit: No significant progress made on any issue in negotiations since March, says EU (The Independent)”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Theresa May’s cabinet repeatedly fails to agree with itself on what customs arrangement it wants with the EU after Brexit
    • (Can we date this quote?)Lua error in Module:utilities at line 136: Language code has not been specified. Please pass parameter 1 to the template. Shakespeare
      If music and sweet poetry agree.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Mark 14:56:
      For many bare false witness against him, but their witness agreed not together.
    • (Can we date this quote?)Lua error in Module:utilities at line 136: Language code has not been specified. Please pass parameter 1 to the template. Sir Thomas Browne
      The more you agree together, the less hurt can your enemies do you.
  2. (intransitive) To yield assent; to accede;—followed by to.
    to agree to an offer, or to opinion.
  3. (transitive, Britain, Ireland) To yield assent to; to approve.
    • 1666, Samuel Pepys, The Diary of Samuel Pepys, page 88:
      ... and there, after a good while in discourse, we did agree a bargain of £5,000 with Sir Roger Cuttance for my Lord Sandwich for silk, cinnamon, ...
    • 2005, Paddy McNutt, Law, economics and antitrust: towards a new perspective, page 59:
      The essential idea is that parties should enter the market, choose their contractors, set their own terms and agree a bargain.
    • 2011 April 3, John Burke, in The Sunday Business Post:
      Bishops agree sex abuse rules
  4. (intransitive) To make a stipulation by way of settling differences or determining a price; to exchange promises; to come to terms or to a common resolve; to promise.
  5. (intransitive) To be conformable; to resemble; to coincide; to correspond.
    the picture does not agree with the original; the two scales agree exactly.
  6. (intransitive, now always with with) To suit or be adapted in its effects; to do well.
    the same food does not agree with every constitution.
  7. (intransitive, grammar) To correspond to in gender, number, case, or person.
  8. (intransitive, law) To consent to a contract or to an element of a contract.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
  • The transitive usage could be considered as just an omission of to or upon.
  • US and Canadian English do not use the transitive form. Thus "they agreed on a price" or "they agreed to the conditions" are used in North America but not "they agreed a price" or "they agreed the conditions".

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

agree

  1. Alternative form of agreen